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 Post subject: Completed Repairs
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 10:16 am 
Christov_Tenn wrote:
The worst thing that happened was that my hands were so cold during disassembly, I damaged the deck in back while removing the aluminum tube that seals the velcro-fastened seam - it caught on the fabric around the "bead" or "bulb" over which the tube runs. I didn't feel the resistance, and it tore about four or five inches. I'll have to stiffen the edges, or tape them with fabric before sewing them together again. Ugh. I love that boat and hate that I clumsily damaged it as a result of my own inadequate planning.


Finally finished repairs and have posted some pictures at:
http://foldingkayaks.org/gallery/album16

Part of the cause of these tears and worn spots, I realized yesterday when sliding the rear-deck seal tube over the velcro seam, is the way the piping under the fabric lays in long curves. Sliding the slit tube over the seam does not uniformly force the piping into the tubes hollow center, and where the slit edge slides over the non-moving piping, the fabric wears thin and eventually tears. The lay of the piping can be pretty clearly seen in the picture showing the tear half-sewn.

Having cold, numb hands and brain the last time I was out didn't help much, either.

Today I've got some better cold weather gear (Thanks Chuck & Dave), the temperature's somewhat warmer, have a sprayskirt and some Chota light mukluks.

Chris


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 7:34 pm 
knight of the folding kayak realm
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:49 pm
Posts: 384
Location: Ireland
Looks like a good job. How long did it take you?

Nohoval


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 Post subject: Time
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:18 pm 
Once I actually got down to the work, it only took about fifteen or twenty minutes. Sewing in a seated position with the work at chest level was what I could not do at home - just not enough space nor good enough lighting. Use of a metal thimble is recommended when sewing through several layers, as I did on the stern near the rudder plate (if that is the correct term?).

Gathering the materials needed after determining what they might be took the most time - fortunately there's an excellent auto upholstery shop in the town where I live - got a needle and thread for $1.00. They'll probably be a good resource if I need a repair that's beyond my ability.

I experimented with glue on some spots that were not worn entirely through, with mixed results. I botched an attempt to glue the edges together of on inch-long tear that I will have to sew to repair properly, once the glue has worn off enough to loosen the edges from the piping. Maybe light sandpaper will free it up.


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 Post subject: Repairs Held Up
PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2006 10:47 am 
Repairs held up fine yesterday under pretty easy assembly and disassembly conditions - ie, no rain and fairly warm - 45 degrees F to assemble and about 63 degrees F to disassemble. This time, while sealing the rear deck with the tube, I was careful to make sure all the piping got up inside it.

C.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2006 4:49 pm 
PROJECT LIGHTING
Christov_Tenn wrote:
Once I actually got down to the work, it only took about fifteen or twenty minutes. Sewing in a seated position with the work at chest level was what I could not do at home - just not enough space nor good enough lighting. Use of a metal thimble is recommended when sewing through several layers, as I did on the stern near the rudder plate (if that is the correct term?).

I experimented with glue on some spots that were not worn entirely through, with mixed results. I botched an attempt to glue the edges together of on inch-long tear that I will have to sew to repair properly, once the glue has worn off enough to loosen the edges from the piping. Maybe light sandpaper will free it up.


I've recently been upgrading my work benches, -better surfaces, seating, lighting, tool mounting, etc. Since I've only recently found a "home port", this wasn't a luxury that made any sense before, so my bench is just starting to become professional grade. One of the re-occuring themes in postings of late has been lighting. The ideal lighting for fine work comes from 2 to 3 sources to eliminate harsh shadows. Basically the problem usually arises in getting the light close enough, but not in the way. I'd been casting my eye about and finally found an Angle Poise -UK (Architect's lamp? -US) at a high end art supply in Denver (Meineger's on Broadway, for those in Colo) for only US$12. What a great price! They had another that was dual incondescent/flourescent for US$70, which I may buy for a second lamp later. These lamps are great in that they can use 100 watt lamps and the lamp can be positioned anywhere in a 1m/3ft radius from their clamp base. This allows one to position light overhead, or mere inches away. If interested parties can't find this lamp let me know and I'll see if I can't find it's web pages, etc.

Work Surface & Seating. Some of the sewing I've needed to do is best accomplished w/ the boat fully assembled, or nearly so. This can help avoid puckering the material. If it weren't for the assembled boat, having the project at table level would be perfect. But the assembled boat puts the project too high for a table, and back breaking for the floor. I happen to have some old military footlockers in which I store my camping gear etc. These are perfect for acting as saw horses to raise the project off the floor. I use a secretary's chair w/ castors for seating that allows me to easily reposition myself. A good chair will have a pnumatic height adjustment so one can easily find a comfortable position. I've seen them in Target for US$20. If one needs a table for an unassembled boat, and affected parties veto the use of the kitchen/dining table, one could use either regular saw horses or stack 1 more foot locker on each 1st foot locker. Put a 4x8 sheet of 3/4" plywood on top and one would have a fairly decent temporary work surface. This is very similar to a British officer's traditional field campaign desk.

Glues. I've seen a legion of recommendations here, but it all boils down to surface. For patching a deck on a Klepper, to avoid puckering the fabric, first I assemble the boat. If I'm dealing w/ a tear, I control the tension of deck surface w/ the amount of air in the sponsons and use a "baseball" stitch to draw the lips of the tear together. Once the tear is "zipped" closed, I make a patch. For all patches, I prefer to round cut my corners on a 2-3cm radius. Square corners, especially w/ hypolon, just beg for something to catch underneath. Making them round greatly reduces this chance. I usually opt to make my patches about 4cm wide for a tear. For a deck patch, I outline the patch w/ a pen, and make sure that the surface is clean. I take Shoe Goo (available on the shoe polish shelf at super markets) -rubber cement would also work, and I apply a thin film on both surfaces and wait about a minute, then apply the patch. You know those credit-card-like gift cards/hotel keys? They make great spatchulas for applying thin films of glue. The patch usually lays flat immediatly and you can start tacking the patch down w/ a small "overhand" stitch right away. I adapted this entire technique from patching bicycle tubes (Anyone remember sew-ups?) and found it works great for Klepper decks. I think the glue probably helps the fabric retain it's water impermability -works great on Wellies! Patches that I've used this technique are nearly invisible and are incredibly flat.

I hope I haven't provided too much unsolicited info, I'm just making observations to the relevent post. :)

-Kap'n


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2006 10:07 pm 
Kaptain von Klepper wrote:
I hope I haven't provided too much unsolicited info, I'm just making observations to the relevent post.


Not to worry. Some good, practical advice you've provided.

The office workshop is extremely well-lit, and that was the greatest help in completing this really very small project. Work space at the correct height was also very helpful. I was a little afraid that I'd spoil the kayak with my inexpert work, so ideal conditions went a long way to nerving me for the task.

I may assemble the boat in the workshop's storage area to work with the soldering gun and pvc patches. Just a few scrapes. Even assembled on the worktables, the height will be about right. If the boat's assembled out of sight (my office has windows opening onto the shop floor), I won't spend the day staring at it and daydreaming. My kayaks are very distracting.

C.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2006 12:55 am 
C,

State-side is where I have my shop(s). My primary shop is in my basement/office w/ guest bedrooms, WC, laundry room and darkroom attached. I haven't upgraded the electrical as of yet, -I'm trying not to solve my inaddequate electrical by using extention cords. (The house is a 1925). Anyway I often have to juggle my drill, Drummel or soddering iron with my photo printer or desk lamp. I should probably be using the drill on the bench in the garage anyway, I think my S.O. would feel better about it. Whenever I have to drill out rivits in a Klepper frame, I end up sending aluminium shavings all over.

Sounds like you have some very innovative ways to fix your boat. Happy paddling! If I ever get to Tenn. I might look you up for some local info :)

-Kap'n


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