Folding Kayaks Forum

The user forum for FoldingKayaks.org
It is currently Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:24 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2010 9:01 pm 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 9:02 pm
Posts: 1035
Location: Astoria, OR
Kenton,

I know a fellow in Vancouver, WA, who has Parkinson's who has installed an electric trolling motor (a Minkota, I think) attached to the nose of his plastic sea kayak, power supplied by a deep cycle 12V battery in the rear compartment. Good for about 3 hours on high, and way longer than that on low. On high, the thing will pull three kayaks along at about 2 -3 knots. Very impressive.

The key is getting a pivot custom fabricated so the attachment to the bow is solid and easy. His pivots and releases easily from the cockpit. Raising it has to be done with the assistance of others.

Another solution which just occurred to me is the Hobie Mirage foot pedal system. I have seen this and it is quite impressive. Quite a few people who fish out of their kayaks have installled it. http://www.hobiecat.com/kayaking/index.html

_________________
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
--
Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 2:24 am 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2009 12:03 am
Posts: 180
Location: Arizona, USA
krudave wrote:
Kenton,

I know a fellow in Vancouver, WA, who has Parkinson's who has installed an electric trolling motor (a Minkota, I think) attached to the nose of his plastic sea kayak, power supplied by a deep cycle 12V battery in the rear compartment. Good for about 3 hours on high, and way longer than that on low. On high, the thing will pull three kayaks along at about 2 -3 knots. Very impressive.

The key is getting a pivot custom fabricated so the attachment to the bow is solid and easy. His pivots and releases easily from the cockpit. Raising it has to be done with the assistance of others.

Another solution which just occurred to me is the Hobie Mirage foot pedal system. I have seen this and it is quite impressive. Quite a few people who fish out of their kayaks have installled it. http://www.hobiecat.com/kayaking/index.html


Excellent input; thank you :thumbs-up:

Considered both, actually. { Great thinks mind alike :) }

I wondered if the movements supporting pedal drive would have the same or similar impact on the back as paddling. I will look into it further, however.

But until your post, here, I had serious questions about an electric Troller's battery life per use ( Minn Kota or any of the other brands ). From what you've just described its capabilities sound terrific, though.

I'm still going to carefully arrange for expert paddling training and get a feel for how much stress the back will be placed under, then move forward based on that.

_________________
Kenton


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 11:59 am 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 9:02 pm
Posts: 1035
Location: Astoria, OR
Kenton wrote: I'm still going to carefully arrange for expert paddling training and get a feel for how much stress the back will be placed under, then move forward based on that.

Be careful. On the Mirage system: essentially no torso rotation involved; everything is below the waist.

_________________
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
--
Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 12:57 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2009 12:03 am
Posts: 180
Location: Arizona, USA
krudave wrote:
Kenton wrote: I'm still going to carefully arrange for expert paddling training and get a feel for how much stress the back will be placed under, then move forward based on that.

Be careful. On the Mirage system: essentially no torso rotation involved; everything is below the waist.


It appears one could obtain the Mirage Drive separate from their hull. If so, that intrigues me. I'm wondering if that could be retro-fitted to a boat of my own fancy ... are you familiar enough to chime in on that?

_________________
Kenton


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:43 pm 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 9:02 pm
Posts: 1035
Location: Astoria, OR
Nope. Out of my league. Never used one. Call Hobie and explain your situation. Pretty innovative company, plus I bet they have an online group you could tap into ... or would know what online goup to access for input.

_________________
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
--
Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 10:24 pm 
Site Admin

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 12:34 pm
Posts: 1742
Location: Southeast Michigan
Fine Woodworking did some tests a number of years ago and found that oil + wax was the most waterproof finish, short of epoxy impregnation. I gave my Klatwa paddle a few coats of Waterlox, which is a good oil finish, and regularly wax it.

_________________
Michael Edelman
FoldingKayaks.org Webmaster


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 05, 2010 11:31 pm 
You can get wood called "impregnated" or "stabilized," which has been completely saturated with some kind of resin, such as acrylic. I imagine they use vacuum or pressure to get the stuff into the grain. It is used for fly rod reel seats, knife handles, and the like. It is possible your Gretsch drum sticks were made out of impregnated wood. Orvis used to make fly rods out of bamboo impregnated with a phenolic resin.

Common varnish chips, leaving gaps where water can enter. Then the water is trapped beneath the remaining layer of varnish. However, I've seen spar varnish which contained lots of oil, and never really hardened. You could dent it with your fingernail years after it was applied, and the dent would level itself out after several minutes. That kind of varnish would not chip or flake easily.

Unlike varnish, oil fills the pores with a hydrophobic material. Thinning oil before application increases the depth of penetration.

I was once told that an oil finish on a tool handle is less likely to raise blisters on the user's hands. Some high-quality canoe paddles which have a varnish finish omit the varnish on the knob where the top hand grips the paddle, for that reason:

" One question we are often asked is “why don’t you varnish the grip?” It prevents blisters on the grip hand." (http://www.shawandtenney.com/classic-wooden-paddles.htm)

Turtle Paddles, another high-quality canoe paddle maker, also appears to omit varnish from the grip, judging by the pictures on their website.


Top
  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group