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 Post subject: what paddle do you use?
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 8:21 pm 
just bought an a2 exp off ebay. call me excited!!!! anyway i need paddles. what are you using ,what length and how do you rate it?this will be most helpful. thanx


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 1:40 am 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:47 pm
Posts: 1712
Location: Arlington, VA (i.e. Wash DC)
Congratulations on your purchase!

We have a section on paddles, on this forum. Most people go with a decent paddle of 240cm for the A2, although a few will tell you that's too long. Some even use canoe paddles with the A2.

viewforum.php?f=15

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Chris T.
~'91 Klepper A2 w/ BSD schooner rig.
'64 Klepper Passat/Tradewind and T12 restoration projects.
Non-folding: '84 Hobie 16; early '90s Old Town Canoe.
Previously owned '04 Pakboat Puffin II and '05 Swift.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 5:04 pm 
About 235-240, I think. This is one of those "black boxes", and you'll find no definite answer. I would go for 240, some 2-piece, with fiberglass or even aluminum shaft (those are cheaper and heavier), and plastic blades, for $60-120. May be even a used one. Because if you get some $400 paddle, and won't like the length, or won't like paddling AE2 solo, you'll end up selling it at loss. Rental shops often have low-end used paddles for $30 or so.

PS: for paddling AE2 as a tandem, you may need paddles of slightly different length for rear and front paddler. At the beginning, just to get started, two paddles of the same length will do.


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 Post subject: I use a 208cm
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 7:52 pm 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2005 12:57 am
Posts: 1228
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Windswift in my boat, an Aerius 2 witha Wayland Skin. I find it less fatiguing and much more efficient than longer paddles. The problem I have with it is the latch that secures the 2 halves gets loosened in waters breaking over the deck.

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Feathercraft Kahuna ( Angela )
Mariner Express ( Miruku Maru ) ( In Storage)
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Northwest Sportee (SuperBoat)
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Nautiraid 14
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 4:12 am 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:47 pm
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Location: Arlington, VA (i.e. Wash DC)
I'll second everything ALM said.

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Chris T.
~'91 Klepper A2 w/ BSD schooner rig.
'64 Klepper Passat/Tradewind and T12 restoration projects.
Non-folding: '84 Hobie 16; early '90s Old Town Canoe.
Previously owned '04 Pakboat Puffin II and '05 Swift.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 12:20 pm 
Having gone through this very dilemma a couple of years back, I'll share what I found out.
As stated above, 235-240cm is often the recommendation. However, there are two factors to consider: the length of the shaft, and the overall paddle length. The Klepper paddles that I have measured 240cm, while an older Klepper paddle that a friend has measured 245cm. The interesting thing is that the shafts were the same length but the blades were a different length.
The second piece of advice I received is this: light makes right. All things being equal (not likely!) a lighter paddle will be less fatiguing.
In the end, we purchased Nimbus Kiska graphite paddles, 235cm (same shaft length as Kleppers, but smaller blades).
Enjoy the quest, and your Klepper. : )
Doug


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 Post subject: To add
PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2007 1:53 pm 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2005 12:57 am
Posts: 1228
Location: Anchorage Alaska
I also use Lendal paddles and use a 200cm Kinetic S with most of my kayaks. ( Too short for most sea kayakers in an A2). Take a good look at the the Lendals http://tinyurl.com/y8dscm
All the blades and shafts are interchangeable so if you get one that is too long or too short, you just have to get another shaft. Great if buy another kayak too.

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Feathercraft Kahuna ( Angela )
Mariner Express ( Miruku Maru ) ( In Storage)
Innova Helios 380
Northwest Sportee (SuperBoat)
Innova Safari
Mariner I
Feathercraft Java
Nautiraid 14
Innova Sunny
Feathercraft K-Light


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 07, 2007 6:29 pm 
forum fanatic

Joined: Fri Dec 29, 2006 5:28 am
Posts: 45
Location: UK
Epic relaxed touring 2 piece with ''lenghth lock'' system (alows you to vary lenghth by 10cm) not a cheap paddle but a lot of features i like. weight,oval shaft,solid ''playless'' joint.

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Klepper AE2 Exp.AE1 Exp.Tyne II(project)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2007 11:26 pm 
knight of the folding kayak realm

Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 1:26 am
Posts: 350
Location: Republic of V.I.
I used to paddle with 240's in my double Klondike, but after trying a shorter paddle I shortened them to 225 cm. No regrets.

My Klondike is somehow different than A-2. Beam is a few inches smaller, and the kayak is about 1.5" lower. so perhaps you will need longer paddles. Try first before cutting (or ordering new ones).

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gregn

Klondike, Nimbus Telkwa


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 Post subject: paddle
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 4:35 pm 
I have also just recently gone through this dilemma, but with a Long Haul Mk. II, which is essentially identical to the A2 for these purposes.

I bought a 240cm Werner Camano and I have to say I could do with a little MORE length, contrary to what others have posted.

I suspect this is because I have a short torso (and am only 5'9" in total). I had to put a 1-inch foam pad under my seat cushion to clear the cockpit enough not to skin my elbows. That said, I have been doing mostly very sedate and laid-back paddles, using almost more of a Greenland style stroke, rather than really digging the paddle in. I suspect this makes a difference, too.


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 Post subject: Re: paddle
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 9:35 pm 
acrosome wrote:
I have been doing mostly very sedate and laid-back paddles, using almost more of a Greenland style stroke, rather than really digging the paddle in. I suspect this makes a difference, too.

If Greenland style stroke is the same as forward stroke with a Greenland paddle, - then I don't undestand. With a GP the strokes are short and very high-angle (and still, such stroke is less energy-consuming than high-angle stroke with a regular "Euro" paddle, because the grip is close to the blade). With kayaks as wide as Klepper AEII, and even with AEI, GP becomes rather ineffective, and the main reason is because wide beam is forcing you towards low-angle stroke, and this is not what GP is designed for.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2007 7:42 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 2:00 pm
Posts: 210
Location: River Danube, Austria
When i had my Klepper AE 1 expedition, i was using this:

Image

This is the 240 cm paddle Isar (asymetic, wood)

Now i am using a 240 cm "flicker" fibreglass paddle made by Feathercraft

Image

i also have a old "little dipper" by Werner, bought at Monterrey Kaykas back in 1996, which i like the best.

Would never go for a shorter paddle!

servus,

Willi

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1960 Klepper T9 (turned into a bookshelf)
1987 Pouch RZ85
1998 Prijon Seayak
2002 Seaward Gemini Tandem
2005 Feathercraft Big Kahuna
2006 Feathercraft K1
2010 Feathercraft Wisper XP


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2007 7:30 pm 
I am 175cm and i use Grey Owl Canada paddles 220cm with narrow long blades. These paddles are amazing, fast and efficient and very beautiful too. Great paddles!!!
Image


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2007 7:35 pm 
forgot to mention they are just 1100g, what is pretty lightweight for wooden paddles. Sorry for the large photo, i'd used one from my web album. :oops:


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 Post subject: Re: paddle
PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2007 10:32 am 
Site Admin

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 12:34 pm
Posts: 1718
Location: Southeast Michigan
Alm wrote:
...With a GP the strokes are short and very high-angle ...


Actually, the traditional Greenland stroke is very low angle- although there are a wide variety of Greenland stokes.

The classic stroke is low angle, with the blade tilted so that it digs in when drawn back; when the paddler stops pulling, the paddle automatically rises to the top of the water.

There was a very good article in Sea Kayaker some time ago in which Maligiaq Padilla demonstrated this.

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