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 Post subject: Kayak for 14 day trip?
PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2014 4:08 pm 
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Hey everyone, I am looking for a kayak that I would be able to take out on 14 day solo trips. I've always taken my canoe out for trips so I'm not really sure if a 14 day kayak trip is too long or not and just needed some advice on what kayak would be best and whether it is possible.

At the moment I'm thinking maybe the Trak Seeker but if there are better options (or cheaper similar options :D) I would love to hear them :).


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2014 8:50 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 12:34 pm
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Location: Southeast Michigan
There are a number of options, most of which cost less than the Trak, and a few of which, like the Feathercraft K1, cost more. At the lower end you have several models from Pakboats and Folbot, which are certainly expedition worthy, and then moving up in price, Long Haul, and Klepper.

Check the main part of the web site (Foldingkayaks.com/WP) for more specific info. It's a little out of date but there are links to all the major makers as well as many reviews. Also check the maker-specific sections here in the forum for good user-supplied information.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2014 12:22 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2011 9:22 am
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Location: Coastal New Jersey
I might be a bit wary of the Trak Seeker. This because of the hydraulic apparatus used to modify the boat's hull shape. There is a demo model on display at the Jersey Paddler and the aforementioned devices are broken, probably because of the usual customer curiosity, playing with them to see how they work. The boat itself is quite good looking and simple except for the mechanical complications.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2014 2:03 pm 
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Depends on where you are going and the type of waters you will paddle

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2014 3:35 am 
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tsunamichuck wrote:
Depends on where you are going and the type of waters you will paddle


x2 to this. Depends on where you want to go and what you want to do. And how light/heavy you have to pack.

If water and food and fire is not an issue, even a small boat will work. Personally I would pick the smaller feathercraft kayaks if all I want is a lightweight package for travelling and am not too concerned about speed. Would cost half a kidney even second hand though.

Folbots are decent value for their relatively low price. I don't really like the way folbot sets up but it is a simpler process than many other folding kayak. The Kiawah is a decent size, reasonably light and really affordable brand new. Material is comparable to the standard nautiraid nulls.

The TRAK is the toughest folding kayak that I have used and offers a lively paddle. The weight and performance are comparable to composite kayaks of a similar length but is rather big when packed compared to smaller folding kayaks. The jacks does lose a bit of tension after a while but still works to tension the kayak. The adjustable sideway trim is also useful and is a good compromise between a skeg and a rudder.

Alternatives such as gumotex/innova sit on top inflatables work too, but you need to carry a pump so that's extra weight and bulk. Performs ok if conditions are mild and it can offer comfort and flexibility that sit in kayaks cannot.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2014 12:04 pm 
lord high faltbotmeister
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If I were taking a trip such as you are describing my choice would be a Pakboat Quest 155 or XT-17 (or, if you can find one, an XT-15 -- discontinued last year but still for sale in some places.). Besides being nicely made kayaks for a reasonable price, their design with the entire deck being able to peel back from bow or stern for access inside the hull, makes packing and unpacking during such a trip much simpler than with other models with solid decks. I say this having owned 3 Feathercrafts and two Pakboats. These are very comfortable boats for extended paddling too.

http://pakboats.com/index.php?option=co ... Itemid=148

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2014 5:37 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 11:31 pm
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I come from the same place as you. I have done three week solo trips in a canoes and we all know you can stack a canoe with gear as high as you feel comfortable and the water conditions allow. This of course is the amusing if not sometimes tragic mistakes new paddlers make.
For a kayak you are always limited since they have that deck covering. I tend to be an expedition paddler, meaning long trips. I like the Folbots for this. Their huge cockpits and wide beams (except Cooper of course) allow a lot of gear and you still get stability and the ability to shed water on the bow with wind and waves. Within reason of course.
There is the advantage of a double when paddled single. You can put a lot of gear in a double when you are alone but you will travel slowly. Folbot's old Super and old Big Glider are cheap and carry a tremendous load. They can be bought for under $500, even below $300 in good condition.
I think my first decision would be "do I want a small double loaded down or a large single loaded down." How much gear and what tradeoff in speed/stability?


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 26, 2014 2:19 am 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle

Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:05 pm
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Location: South Salem, NY
The Klepper Aerius II is a double and probably the most common folder on the used market. Also one of the toughest and heaviest. They can be paddled solo and you will get a lot of different opinions on that if you ask here. They will carry a serious amount of gear and can be comfortably sailed with a few different sail options. I've never packed a canoe for tripping but I'm sure the AEII will hold about as much as you need. Prices can range anywhere from $800 to $2500 used depending on condition, model and options (many come with a sail rig).

I paid $2000 for mine a few years ago. It's a 1991ish vintage, expedition model and came with a full sail rig in very good condition. It has served me well and I'm not easy on it.

Long Haul Folding Kayaks makes an American version of this boat called the Mark II. This boat can carry a payload between 800-900 lbs and it won't let you down.

d

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 4:00 pm 
faltbootemeister
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Joined: Tue Nov 26, 2013 5:36 pm
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Location: west burbs of Chicago
All good recommendations for good boats.
But
We still can't be more specific without knowing what kind of water you'll be traveling and what style your trip will be.
If you'll camp every night in a new place, ease of loading unloading will be key. Kayaks are a pain to pack compared to a canoe. Pakboats are easiest with removable decks, Folbots are next with big, long zippers in the decks. Others here can tell you about other brands.

The advantage of a decked boat is that you can take on some big waves (depending on your skill of course) without shipping water. Same if you get caught in driving rain.

Give us some idea what you're doing and we'll get down to specifics for you.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2014 9:19 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 12:34 pm
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Kayaks are a bit more work to pack than canoes- but not that much more difficult, and you on;ly have to do it once a day ;-) . I used to camp out of a Klepper single.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 2:24 pm 
lord high faltbotmeister
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Location: inland Pennsylvania, USA
Pakboat has some really good deals for sale on their company website, selling some used and demo boats, plus the discounts on the remaining stock of the XT-15 which I had recommended to you. Packing for and loading a Pakboat will be exactly like you've always done with your canoes

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Pakboat XT-15


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2014 6:43 pm 
lord high faltbotmeister

Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2007 8:05 am
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I think we are talking to ourselves on this. The question was posed by a new participant who has not been in this conversation for almost two weeks. All the advice is solid, I am just afraid it is falling on deaf ears. Or maybe not, I am not judging.

g

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 10:14 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2014 8:53 am
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Location: Annapolis, MD
Hi Everybody,

I am a very new member as well, and although I am not the poster of this original question, I am finding this thread very helpful.

If the original poster isn't going to offer up a location, perhaps I can! I am planning on an extended trip in the Southeast Alaskan islands region, perhaps as far south as the BC islands. So...cold waters, strong currents in channels, lots of rain, and the potential for big waves. What would you all recommend? I am from the east coast so I have been researching folding kayaks as a way for me to make the trip feasible without having to worry about trying to purchase on arrival and then attempt to sell before departure...trying to bring my Valley Avocet would be insanely expensive on any major airline or via shipping.

As far as budget goes, I can rationalize spending ~$2000, perhaps up to $2500 when considering all the extras (spray skirt/deck, 3 or 4 piece paddle, etc.), with the understanding from other reviews that these boats can last decades and I would be able to take it on many other trips of this caliber in the future. I would like to buy new if possible.

Thanks!

Conor


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 2:27 pm 
Site Admin

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 12:34 pm
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Location: Southeast Michigan
First question: How are your kayaking skills? Do you have a good roll?

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 2:49 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2014 8:53 am
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Location: Annapolis, MD
I have rolled my hardshell avocet just a few times, but have never paddled a folding kayak. I hear/read they are much more difficult to roll. So I do not have any experience rolling a folding kayak.
I can execute a paddle float re-entry and understand the risks involved in such an area of paddling. I plan on using the next couple winters to practice rolling and re-entries during the winter here in Maryland. This is one reason I am researching so far in advanced (trip wouldn't be until 2016) as I would like to have my chosen folding kayak in hand well before the trip to get as much time as possible familiar with the boat.


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