Kayak Tour Magazine Locations

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Kapitän von Klepper

Kayak Tour Magazine Locations

Post by Kapitän von Klepper »

There's some great location write-ups in 2006 Kayak Touring an annual by Canoe & Kayak Magazine. Among other locations, Greece and Maui, but of most interest was a reference to Isla Carmen, Loreto, Mexico on the sea of Cortez. This would be an easy long weekend trip for most paddlers from the South West to the Texas Gulf Coast regions. I'll probably be checking this out sometime this late winter or early spring.
Also, if you check this mag out... Check out those Tsunami Rangers! Is that insane, or what! :shock:
Last edited by Kapitän von Klepper on Thu Dec 22, 2005 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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chrstjrn
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Post by chrstjrn »

I've had my on Greece. Sea of Cortez is a little difficult to get to...

Yes, the Tsunami Rangers ARE insane...
Chris T.
Klymit Packraft
In storage in the US:
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Alm

Re: Kayak Tour Magazine Locations

Post by Alm »

Kaptain von Klepper wrote:There's some great location write-ups in Kayak Tour an annual by Canoe & Kayak Magazine. Among other locations, Greece and Maui, but of most interest was a reference to Loreto, Mexico on the sea of Cortez. This would be an easy long weekend trip for most paddlers from the South West or Gulf Coast regions. I'll probably be checking this out sometime this late winter or early spring.
Also, if you check this mag out... Check out those Tsunami paddlers! Is that insane, or what!
From the link provided by Aegean Sea local, Niko - Greece has good island-hopping in this area: http://www.seakayakgreece.com/ . I don't know anything about this outfitter and can't recommend it (or any other), but they have honestly provided a lot of information on their webite, with maps, photos, suggested routes, and links to air or bus/ferry transportation from Athens. Heavy winds are blowing there from early June to early September, so the best time is May or late September. Mediterranean winter is not as warm as in Baja California, and much less predictable. It's on my list, together with Exumas Land and Sea Park, if I will ever make myself to pay a thousand for air/bus/ferry tickets. (Exumas are on Bahamas, but small local aircrafts charge very steep prices). Most likely, I would take Kahuna in both these destinations.

Loreto sounds familiar, - but unless you are very close to Mex.Baja/USA border, this also costs a lot. Loreto is THE most expensive air destination among all 3 commercial airports of Baja Califorina (Loreto, La Paz and Los Cabos). The reason is that this town has become a cluster of US expatriots, spending there most of their retirement years, with friends and relatives visiting them often. The flight, say, from Seattle to Loreto, may cost the same as the flight from Seattle to overseas - London or Frankfurt.

As to the paddlin around Loreto - there are few islands in the immediate proximity, and they will be full of kayakers most of the year. The route from Mulege to Loreto will provide more feeling of wilderness, still, you might have to share some landing spots with other kayakers or groups of kayakers, especially in "good months" (which extend to most of the year in this area). Getting to Mulege from Loreto is very easy, - there are buses every 3-4 hours. Almost nobody paddles in the opposite direction - from Loreto to Mulege, due to prevailing winds.

Maui - I donno... Been there (without a kayak); south coast is dry and sunny all year round, but north cost is rainy and cloudy in fall and winter (and in summer it is too hot out there). There used to be a nice campsite Pekusa, 10 km from Lahaina, $5 per person with tent, - may be it's still there. Large portion of the south coast is protected with corall reef, but paddling beyond the reef looks scary. The coastline is populated and developed almost everywhere. I wouldn't imagine a multiday trip along this coast (nowhere to set a tent), but radial trips from Pekusa down south-east, with lunch stops on beaches - looks possible.

Kapitän von Klepper

Post by Kapitän von Klepper »

You're right about the airfares. Frontier is our new star flying out of Denver and a sample fare was at $616, round trip. Steep, but not insanely out of range for a fix on a serious case of paddling/cabin fever.
As for paddling Maui, the article had specifics.
One of my great regrets is that I didn't have my Faltboot when I was living on Oahu or "The Big Island". I paddled a few hardshells, but w/ the stability of my Klepper and a sail rig, I would have been tempted to do some island hopping. I still cast a longful glace that way from time to time, and may do it yet, spouse permitting.
One advantage I have w/ the double is that the 2 of us can each have a free checkable. When not on photo assignments I generally carry-on nearly all my clothes, etc, which on more generous airlines would allow me to solo my double. If we begin consistantly losing second check options, I may be forced to get a one-bag "Scout".

Alm

Post by Alm »

The cheapest flights to Loreto are probably from LA - this is where Aeromexico operates, jointly with some US airlines. From any other place the cost of flying to Loreto is outrageous, 3 times more than to San Diego. Even after bus addition (mexican bus from Tijuana) it is still 2-2.5 times cheaper. Long ride, about 15 hours (with lunch stop for driver). In your situation, with direct flight from Denver, may be savings with the bus will not bi significant.
I think, this ride will be long even for somebody living in San Diego and taking his car, so going to Loreto for long weekend - I doubt... Expensive gasoline (more expensive than in the USA), insurance and corrupted cops will all contribute to the cost of the car ride.

Contrary to the popular belief, mexicans mostly don't speak English. At least, I didn't see any English-speaking bus driver or other bus personnel - luggage handlers, cashiers etc. Bus isn't viewed as something for "gringo", even though Baja long-distance buses are not those "chicken buses" from old movies. In fact, they are better than american Greyhound, - same airconditioned models, but more leg room and more tolerance to extra-heavy luggage, - for extra pesos, of course. Knowing a few words and simple questions saves a lot of nerves. On RV campsites they speak more English, because this is "for gringo".

Paddling from Mulege to Loreto will almost inevitably include the bus, even if you take your car with you (returning to the car by bus).

Island hopping from Oahy - where to? I didn't chekc the map, but Molokai and Maui are at substantial distance, across the open ocean. Departing from the Oahu south side, you'll have to land on the south side of Maui or Molokai again - north shores of these islands are horrible. So, the route becomes quite long. Paddle Maui - Lanai - may be. Departing from Maui Lahaina or Pekusa and landing at the south tip of Lanai (forgot the name of their only south harbor)... Booking the room in Lanai hotel or spot at the Lanai harbor campsite in advance, - such a humdrum... 1-hour ride back to Maui on ferry; why not.

Kapitän von Klepper

Post by Kapitän von Klepper »

Thanks for the info on LAX.
Actually I think Greyhound is now the chicken-bus. I'm extremely reserved about using Greyhound for even the shortest trips. Contrarily I use buses in Latin America for extensive travel. Much more comfortable, etc. Y esta cosita sobre la idioma no me molesta mucho, tampoco!

FYI, anyone who's reading or interested: The trains are back up and running in Chile! They are now transversly more popular, faster and slightly more expensive than the buses. Booking your trip a couple hrs. in advance is recommended. The bus & train fares anywhere in Latin America (and Europe for that matter) make Grey Hound and Am Track seem like hi-way robbers from a 3rd world country, -especially value wise!

About Island hopping: The distance from Oahu's windward side to Lanai is about 35 mi. Fortunately you would have a decent crosswind both ways. It's usually pretty easy to see Lanai from the windward side, and especially from the Pali hi-way pass. The distance from the Kahala coast on Hawai'i is roughly 35 miles, but again w/ a decent cross wind both ways. both Hali'aka and Mona Loa/Kea would be hard to miss on clear days. Agreed that northshore landings could be a challenge, especially in winter. Both Wiamea and Turtel Bay have more gentle surf even in the winter, -I've snorkeled in the surf in these regions, :shock: -Not as crazy as it sounds, just watch those sets and stick to the edges!
There's an inter-island ferry?! I would have given my eye-teeth for that when I was living there. Kaima-aina air fares aren't too bad, but then you get stuck on another island w/out transportation. -I never tried it, but Oahu's "The Ride" might let you strick one of your kayak bags on their bike racks.

Alm

Post by Alm »

Kaptain von Klepper wrote: There's an inter-island ferry?! I would have given my eye-teeth for that when I was living there. Kaima-aina air fares aren't too bad, but then you get stuck on another island w/out transportation. -I never tried it, but Oahu's "The Ride" might let you strick one of your kayak bags on their bike racks.
Yes, inter-island ferry, but not from Oahu - from Maui (Lahaina) to Lanai. Probably less than an hour, - don't remember. You better check with Lahaina - they are based there. That harbor at the southernmost tip of Lanai is pretty close to Maui south shore, I think less than 30 miles. Winds should be at beam both ways, - but this is a theory, I've never paddled there. You're stuck without transportation on most of Hawaii anyway, unless you rent a car or hire a taxi. Only Oahu has some a decent bus system. Lanai has no public transportation, AFAIK, but it isn't really needed there. Legal or illegal taxi shouldn't be a problem from Lanai airport in the middle of the island to the harbor on the southern tip, if needed. On Maui, wherever there is any landing spot on the south side, there always be a highway with 24-hour traffic of rental cars few dozen meters away, and a major resort right on the beach, or few miles away, with phone or taxi.

Kapitän von Klepper

Post by Kapitän von Klepper »

Should add, about transportation on Islands other than Oahu* buying a "Maui Beach Cruiser" is an economical alternative to transportation if you're going to be around for a while. In '01 on "The Big Island" I had the incredible good fortune to get a '79 Mazda Hatchback w/ only 70,000 miles and almost no rust. I paid only $900 and drove it for 9 months and 10,000 miles. I only tuned it up and changed the brakes, -on the Kahala coast, to go to the beach, I had a 5 mile drive w/ a 3,000 ft. altitude difference. I'd nearly burn my brakes on the way down (no gears low enough for that!) and have the engine just below red line on the way back up. But by keeping the car in good nick, I was able to sell it right away for $1000 when I was done. I expect very few people to be as lucky as I was, however on a buyer beware this is a great option for temporary residents or students. (Shipping a car from the main land at that time was $800 & 3 weeks each way.)

*The bus service is so good, that at the time I was living there '99-'00, $1 could get you just about anywhere on the Island. At that time they had been the winner for 5 straight years for the best regional transportation system in the US. Like many RT systems, they have bike racks on their fronts. I wouldn't swear to it, but I think I've seen short boards brought on board and your international student backpacker set (which I was) regularly brought their baggage on board.

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