chilean and argentina

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lachlan

chilean and argentina

Post by lachlan »

G'day at the end of the year I'm planning on heading to Chile and Argentina and paddling around Cape Horn. Has anyone ever been there or know anyone that might have?
I'm looking for any info anyone out there might have, so don't hold back.
Lachlan

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krudave
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Post by krudave »

Here is a discussion of that: http://www.wetdawg.com/pages/bulletin/a ... /t-91.html

Good luck.
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
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Kapitän von Klepper

Post by Kapitän von Klepper »

I was able to find the following for you on the web.

Howard Rice sailed a Klepper around the Horn in 1989.

The German Book Im Faltboot um Kap Horn "Around Cape Horn in a Foldingkayak" by Arverd Fuchs, looks like just what the Dr. ordered, -if you have a handle on German :?

Charles Porter (1979) has his story supposedly inOcean Magazine if you have the time to find the exact issue.

You might have better luck than me, but another person of interest would be Michael Vogeley in his Magellan Straight expedition of 1996.

I can't remember the issue, but I think I read an article in Seakayaker in Jan or Feb of last year about going around the Horn.

I've done a little kayaking off of Chiloe. Suffice to say the kayaking in this part of Chile will be easier in the inland passages (Almost an exact copy of Alaska and British Columbia) than on the Ocean. The sites are marvelous and include numerous glacier bays. I can't tell you anything about the Argentine side. This will be rural Chile and Argentina which mean you will need to be prepared to communicate in Spanish to some degree as almost nobody will speak any English.

-Andreas

lachlan

thanks

Post by lachlan »

hey guys thanks for looking into that stuff for me. have you ever been down that way kaptain? any ideas for one thing i should look out for over anything else? apart from it being cold and rough?
thanks and happy paddling
lachlan

Kapitän von Klepper

Post by Kapitän von Klepper »

Unfortunately I've never been that far south. :( Personally if I were going kayaking in this region of the world, I'd opt for the Magellan Strait.
Image
I suppose much depends upon experience, but I know I wouldn't be up for Cape Horn myself; it's generally considered the Mt. Everest of navigation.
Wikapedia wrote:The climate in the region is generally cool, due to the southern latitude. There are no weather stations in the group of islands including Cape Horn; however, a study in 1882-1883 found an annual rainfall of 1,357 millimetres (53.42 in), with an average annual temperature of 5.2 °C (41.4 °F). Winds were reported to average 30 kilometres per hour (19 mph), with squalls of over 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph) occurring in all seasons.

Contemporary weather records for Ushuaia, 146 kilometres (91 mi) north, show that summer (January–February) average temperatures range from highs of 14 °C (57 °F) to lows of 5 °C (42 °F); in winter (July), average temperatures range from 4 °C (40 °F) to −2 °C (29 °F). Cloud cover is generally high, with averages from 5.2 eighths in May and July to 6.4 eighths in December and January. Precipitation is high throughout the year: the weather station on the nearby Diego Ramirez Islands, 109 kilometres (68 mi) south-west in the Drake Passage, shows the greatest rainfall in March, averaging 137.4 millimetres (5.41 in); while October, which has the least rainfall, still averages 93.7 millimetres (3.69 in). Wind conditions are generally severe, particularly in winter. In summer, the wind at Cape Horn is gale force up to 5% of the time, with generally good visibility; however, in winter, gale force winds occur up to 30% of the time, often with poor visibility.
I do know that Punta Arenas has a few kayaking tours to offer and I've seen magnificant pics of the strait. In the strait itself I'd expect great distances between tiny outposts, much the same as BC or Alaska; only with a 99.9% chance that nobody speaks English (Aside from Punta Arenas). After I've said that, you'll end up finding slews of English speaking hermits every time you land that were attracted to the wild desolation of the place but are desperate for converation and will probably talk your ears off :roll: .

I really can't be of that much help to you. I'd strongly advise reading every article or book you can lay your hands on. Anything I or anyone else says without 1st hand experience would be pure speculation.

Aside from the fact that it's an extremely isolate place, I'd recommend getting something like a Cliffnotes Guide of Spanish Vocabulary, -¿Assuming you don't habla? Memorize everything on it and carry it in your pack. These are only one sheet, with a basic vocabulary cheat sheet on both sides and are even laminated in plastic. -This way you won't be biting off more than you can chew by promising yourself you'll study a full self study language course which 99% of us would never get around to completing :?

-Andreas

acrosome

Post by acrosome »

Wow. Cape Horn, eh? As others have mentioned there was an article in one of the kayaking rags a few months ago about transiting the Strait of Magellan and THAT sounded bad enough. I mean, really bad. IIRC they also had issues with the Chilean Navy, who has jurisdiction in those waters. Please find a copy of the article and read it. (And, mind you, I'm the guy who told Krudave to stop mother-henning me about my planned Alaska trip, so even if I'm inexperienced I'm at least not a sissy.) (Not that I'm calling Krudave a sissy- before someone tries to put words in my mouth.)

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Post by krudave »

The article was in Sea Kayaker; aside from access issues, they also had to contend with helacious winds.

I've been called a mother-something else a couple of times, but never a mother hen. I guess that's an improvement. :roll: :wink:
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
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Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.

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Re: chilean and argentina

Post by sroberge »

here is what i posted locally for january 2020 if you are interested.

p.s. I would be willing to fly to you should you be far away and wanted to check if we could be compatible for this trip
_

I am looking for participants in a sea kayak trip in Patagonia next January. While the main event would be to sea kayak in Chilean Patagonia fjords with glaciers for three weeks starting in Puerto Natales, I am also planning a week in the world famous trekking destination Torres Del Paine.

I could organise most of the sea kayak trip as I had it pretty much all cooked last fall when I had to cancel. I drove to Lake Powell instead for 4 wks of sea kayaking. While I can do most of the organizing, it would a self-guided trip. I am certified Level Two and I been doing sea kayaking expeditions for 25 years in various challenging places.

To see the location of kayaking trip, you can put “Camp Kiara, Natales, Chile” in Google maps and you will get a sense of the area. Further info and videos, can be obtained at https://soijen.com/exploring-fiordo-montanas-overview/ and the owner of the refuge mentionned there could be used as local support including to stay in his refuge if desired (I am thinking to stay there for a day on the way in and one other night on the way out so we are his clients while there). A little portage of 3 km can be used to get there without facing the strong current of Patagonia (see “Camp Resi, Natales, Chile” in Google maps).

Another options for kayaking would to come back from Torres Del Paine on the Serrano River (just enter “Serrano River, Torres de Paine, Chile” in google map) and get pickup by boat at Puerto Torro glacier. This pickup could be difficult to arrange for those without a folding kayak but it could be looked into, which I have not done last fall.

The backpacking part would be done first and it would be a good use of time while waiting for the Chile Government (Park authority and Navy) needs to grant us the authorizations. I have an INREACH Device that could report daily our position to the Navy via satellites as required by the Chile Government.

Leaving aside the airfare to Puntas Arenas, Chile, the next biggest financial commitment for this trip would be to have the proper kayak. I had planned this kayaking trip with a folded kayak (I have a K1 by Feathercraft) that I was flying to Patagonia with so I am not sure if you can rent good sea kayak there. I could checked into that but the best would to bring a folded kayak. I have an extra K1 and I know someone with a K2.

As the kayaking and camping would be challenging, the composition and capacity of the group is very important. It is therefore important that interested persons be able to do group activity over the next few months in order to make sure that participants are compatible, capable, well equipped and fit enough. I expect that the trip will get confirmed early next September.

If you are interested, the next step would be that you send me an e-mail (stephane_roberge@hotmail.com) with a phone number or another way to talk and, most importantly, a detailed description of your gears as well as relevant experiences and certifications with the year for each of them. If this step is satisfactory, you will be invited to join in on kayaking for short trip and, eventually, to a weekend of kayaking camping. These short trips and weekends would ensure the group’s compatibility and everyone’s capacity. Please note that a simple RSVP is not going to be considered and will not be followed up on unless the above e-mail is provided.

As the first kayaking events would be soon when the water is still very good, a full body drysuit would be mandatory for these events. Anyhow, this would be mandatory for Patagonia

Stephen from Gatineau, Quebec, Canada
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sroberge
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Re: chilean and argentina

Post by sroberge »

I did a tons of reaearch last year about that. I learned that the chile government would never allow you to go without a support boat out of puerto williams. However, they would be fine if you do it out of puerto natales and the fjords and glaciers are as great as in the beagle channel. see above for the trip that I am planning in january 2020
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Re: chilean and argentina

Post by siravingmon »

Google Howard Rice and Williwaws to get an idea of how terrifyingly dangerous the winds can be down that way
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