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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:49 pm 
My name is Westcoastwill, after visiting lots of times, finnaly i became a newbie to the site today.

Here is a seakayaker from Austria with strong roots on the canadian westcoast.

For paddling on the river Danube, i have a Prijon Seayak stored in the old clubhouse, but for the weekends in the austrian lake district of the Salzkammergut or extended trips on the westcoast, i am assembling my Feathercraft K1 or my Kahuna, both with the new cockpit coaming.

I had a custom made Klepper Aerius Expedition AE1 but after a trip with friends i got hooked on Feathercraft kayaks and ended up selling the Klepper.


Here is a big hello :) to Dave and Matt, nice to meet you guys here.

Servus to all


:P

Westcoastwill


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:50 pm 
Site Admin
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 9:02 pm
Posts: 1035
Location: Astoria, OR
westcoastwill wrote:
Here is a big hello :) to Dave and Matt, nice to meet you guys here.
And you, also. Are you healed yet?

_________________
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
--
Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 3:56 am 
knight of the folding kayak realm

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 1:06 pm
Posts: 359
Location: Spruce Head, Maine
Westcoast,

Quote:
I had a custom made Klepper Aerius Expedition AE1


What were the differences between your Klepper and a stock expedition AE1?

What was it about the Feathercrafts that you preferred?

Paul


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 11:53 am 
I'm envious of your location. My parents were able to use my AE II there and of course classics such as:

Image

have great things to say.

Regards,

-Andreas


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 5:10 pm 
Due to a bike crash 8 weeks agao, i am still not getting a good grip on the paddle, thanks for asking, Dave, but i am in therapy 3 times a week and work hard to get back into the cockpit again, doing better every week.

Paul, Klepper in Rosenheim usually does not deal with buyers directly, but i was able to convince them to take my order anyway, i figured it would be too complicated to order via a third party, something would have gone wrong for shure! So they took my order and allowed me to pick it up at their location.

My olive AE1 was the first one with both front AND rear loading hatches, they even figured out a way to install the spare paddle holders (the old pouch style)between the cockpit and the front loading hatch, complete deck rigging with bungee cord and life line, as well as the long discontinued carriing loops on stern and bow (they use now wooden handles). i also bought all avaliable accessoies from bags to sail S1 sailrig.

But as i mentioned, i got hooked to Feathercraft and sold to boat to a really nice guy from Germany, who was living in Atlanta, Georgia. it shure helped to work for an international express carrier!

Sometimes, i regret selling the AE1, it was a classic beauty, but i am really happy with my K1 and Kahuna and the one bag thing works a lot better for me, when i fly over to the westcoast for extended paddling trips. i also like the seasock and feel very save on open waters and long crossings.

Reading Herbert Rittlingers books draw me to kayaking like a magnet, Andreas and i was the happiest guy, when i bought my first used Pouch RZ 85 back in 1987. My brother and me went down the Danube from the border to Germany to Hungary on the first trip that very summer, at a time, when folding kayaks where really a rare sight on the river, but i tell you, they came back big! The rivers have changed a lot since Herberts days, but if you know where to paddle, you can still find the paradies, described in his books ( it took my years to find and buy them all )



8)

servus,

Willi


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 11:52 am 
Willi wrote:
Reading Herbert Rittlingers books draw me to kayaking like a magnet, Andreas and i was the happiest guy, when i bought my first used Pouch RZ 85 back in 1987. My brother and me went down the Danube from the border to Germany to Hungary on the first trip that very summer, at a time, when folding kayaks where really a rare sight on the river, but i tell you, they came back big! The rivers have changed a lot since Herberts days, but if you know where to paddle, you can still find the paradies, described in his books ( it took my years to find and buy them all )

Rittlinger was an amazing man and very much appeals to my adventurous nature. It is extremely difficult to find his books in English or Spanish and my German language reading level seems to be temporarily stuck at pre-teen level. (One can only read the entire Tim und Struppi or Asterix for maintaining language ability before going crazy!) So I have to struggle through some of Rittlingers books in German. My copy of Ich kamm die Reissenden Fluss Herab has its price in Reichmarks :? and its print in old German script, -which adds a further challenge to reading!
I noticed that Rittlinger was nominated to the international whitewater hall of fame this year. Adventure Sport Center.com

Bis Spater,

-Andreas


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2006 4:58 pm 
Andreas, I could tell that you are a great fan of Tim & Struppi, but dont miss the other albums form Herge, Kaptain Archibald Haddock von Klepper! :D

Let me know, if i can help finding rare Rittlinger folding kayak books! My favorites: Ganz allein zum Amazonas and Im Land der Lacandonen.

In 1985, i took the train from Santiago down to Puerto Montt, a bumpy ride after a big earthquake, the same one, that damaged a marine bureau in Valparaiso, as a result my trip to Juan Fernandez got cancelled, but i hope to come back someday with my Kahuna!

It seems there are some mutual interests!

Servus

:wink:

Willi


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2006 2:17 pm 
Hallo

Always a pleasure to meet another Tim und Struppi fan, -you wouldn't believe how unheard of they are in the US (Tintin & Snowy). In Spanish they are known as Tintin y Milu. I don't have quite the appatite for wiskey as my avatar's likeness :wink: , however, I'll rarely turn down a good beer or wine (in moderation of course :roll: :wink: )
I think Tim would have made a fantastic Faltbooter if Herge had thought of it.

Ganz allein zum Amazonas is currently available in Spanish, Solo Por Las Altas Selvas de La Amazonia, recently published in 2000 (Though I'm not sure is this might not be Ich kamm die Reissenden Fluss Herab because of the reference to the High jungles of the Amazon) and Im Land der Lacandonen was published first in 1962 as Last of the Lacadonian and later as Last of the Maya in English. Some of these can be found for reasonable prices here at Amazon.com. Being such a great Faltboot & kayak Pioneer, I'm surprised Herbert Rittlinger's name doesn't come up here more often. Of course, Faltboot expeditions aren't the only thing he was known for... :wink:

There is seemingly no end of fantastic kayaking opportunities in Chile! Family legend has it that my father and uncle had some wild ww adventures on some of the rivers in the south in my grandfather's Klepper T-12. A wilder legend has it that my grandfather sailed up a river. :?: This story is usually to boast of his prowress as a sailor, but I personally can't see sailing up anything except the lower Bio Bio with extremely favourable conditions. :?

-Andreas


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 2:33 pm 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:47 pm
Posts: 1715
Location: Arlington, VA (i.e. Wash DC)
There are plenty of Tintin fans out here, Andreas!

_________________
Chris T.
~'91 Klepper A2 w/ BSD schooner rig.
'64 Klepper Passat/Tradewind and T12 restoration projects.
Non-folding: Early '90s Old Town Canoe.
Previously owned '04 Pakboat Puffin II and '05 Swift (prototype), as well as an '84 Hobie 16.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2006 7:20 pm 
Image

Chris,

Ah, another Tintin fan! 8)
Is "here" Japan, Switzerland or the US? The website has a good Japanese section: http://www.tintin.co.jp/

Barnes & Noble generally carries Tintin, buried in their graphic novel section. My collection was acquired in Europe und ist ganz auf Deutsch.

-Andreas


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2006 1:17 am 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:47 pm
Posts: 1715
Location: Arlington, VA (i.e. Wash DC)
Nyon, Switzerland, where Herge hid out after his breakdown-- featured in "The Calculus Affair".

I would say that Tintin is very much in the spirit of our folding boats :wink:

_________________
Chris T.
~'91 Klepper A2 w/ BSD schooner rig.
'64 Klepper Passat/Tradewind and T12 restoration projects.
Non-folding: Early '90s Old Town Canoe.
Previously owned '04 Pakboat Puffin II and '05 Swift (prototype), as well as an '84 Hobie 16.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2006 7:25 am 
Last year, I bought my young nephewsTin Tin books for their birthdays and at Christmas. Great illustrations and interesting stories. Good sequential art intended to fire the imagination - will hopefully inspire the kids to do more than play computer games or watch the Disney Channel.

Chris


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2006 12:34 pm 
Too bad, that Tim never ventured out in a folding kayak!

Beside Herb Rittlingers books, there are also some really good books on folding kayak expeditions avaliable on ebay or amazon, especially for german readers,
here are my favorites:

C. B. Schewrla: "Kanada im Faltboot" ( THE folding kayak book writer form the 1920 and 1030s)

Arved Fuchs: "Im Faltboot um Kap Hoorn" (should be avaliable in english too)

Konrad Gallei: "Im Banne der Arktis" (Spitzbergen) and
"Ost - Groenland", great photos, best books from
Cold Conrad!

I wonder if there are any books on the markt with Feathercrafts, exept "a boat in the baggage)

Andreas: with your family background and knowlege, you should consider writing your own book about kleppers and chile!

For all kayaking comix fans: dont miss the adventures of Blake & Mortimer!




:lol:


Willi


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 12:13 pm 
Christov_Tenn wrote:
Last year, I bought my young nephewsTin Tin books for their birthdays and at Christmas. Great illustrations and interesting stories. Good sequential art intended to fire the imagination - will hopefully inspire the kids to do more than play computer games or watch the Disney Channel.

Chris


One can definitely do worse than Tintin books for the kids. Anyway, who's to say they are just for kids? The German editions have the caption on the cover: For children 8 to 80. :wink: My mother used to read them on the sly when we were kids. The stories are engaging and though some of the art is reaching 80 years, (-My rare copy of Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (In French) was originally published in the 20's and wasn't Herge's best work.) Some of the earlier stories are on the silly side too: Tintin in Congo & Tintin in America. Herge eventually started addressing more serious subjects such as international conterfeiting rings (The Black Island) Weapons Espionage (Calculous Affair), Drug Smuggling (Crab with the Golden Claws, Cigars of the Pharoahs, etc.) Many of his stories could be adapted to feature length live action films with just a tad of slap-stick comic relief.
My brother and I concieved of possibly making a documentary film just to explore the real world of Tintin. Exploring the real locations (with the exception of the Moon of course :wink: ) and comparing and contrasting the cultures, etc.
Herge could have easily used a folding kayak to get Tintin into the Amazon in The Arumbaya Fetish if he'd thought of it. It would have been contemporary to Herbert Rittlingers "I Came Down the Rushing River" in a very similar location.

Willi: Thanks for the tip on the other books. It stands to reason there would be more folding kayak adventure books in German than English (or Spanish). The folding kayak is to the Austrians and Germans what canoeing is to North Americans, -the epitome of the wilderness camping experience.
I grew up reading adventure stories (beyond Tim) and have always been fascinated by the genre. I have to wonder if it's possible to really make a living completely in this lifestyle today. In Herbert's day the world was lesser known and somebody could go to an exotic location and write about their experiences. They were novel to more people. Today however any given location has had scores of books and magazines written about it.
I've been struggling to some degree to carve out a life as a freelance photographer with a rollercoaster of success. (Up and down). I've been thinking of combining it with Robert Kiyosaki's "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" philosophy on wealth management & investing and possibly doing some fiction writing, -though I have a long way to work on my writing style :? ! The problem is that few of these freelance options have real money in them and it's very difficult to pursue while employed for someone else...
The next consideration is that the whole media is in a state of transition. Sort of like the transition of books to TV that occured 50 years ago. We're already playing with it on this forum. We all have digital cameras and some writing ability. We all go on our own little adventures and write about them on this forum. We all share how-to's. We have the ability to put together complex and insightful articles. The context of these articles can even be Googled. In the future, are people going to be willing to pay for articles even from the best writers for what to an increasing degree they can get for free on forums and blogs? :? By the way, I'm not suggesting that everything that is on a blog or forum is as reliable as information in orodox publishing; there's a lot of B.S. out there.
I'd love to live the lifestyle. I just have to see if it's possible.

-Andreas


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 4:04 pm 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:47 pm
Posts: 1715
Location: Arlington, VA (i.e. Wash DC)
While I was back in the States, this Summer, I bought my godson a Tintin book for his birthday (The Calculus Affair, actually).

Tintin did use a "bagboat" at least once-- a raft. Was it in the Red Sea?

_________________
Chris T.
~'91 Klepper A2 w/ BSD schooner rig.
'64 Klepper Passat/Tradewind and T12 restoration projects.
Non-folding: Early '90s Old Town Canoe.
Previously owned '04 Pakboat Puffin II and '05 Swift (prototype), as well as an '84 Hobie 16.


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