Home made AKA for $5 bucks and my sailing parts.

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DasBlauwal4

Re: Home made AKA for $5 bucks and my sailing parts.

Post by DasBlauwal4 »

I estimate that I have about $150 into the project including thread and needles and hardware. The crutches were $5 off craigslist. Seamark is around $30 a yard (1.5 yards). Shelter-rite is around $14 a yard (1.5 yards). thread and needles $10. H66 $15. Klepper J bolts $30 for 2. NRS valves .50, Valve tubing ect.

I have a bit of Shelter-rite leftover to make some forward and aft floats. Dennis, this stuff is perfect for making sponsons, it comes on a 60" roll.

My kids were all over the boat at the time, we had a lot of fun playing.

I had no idea how to thread a bobbin or sew before this project, but once I smoked a spindle practicing and watched a few youtube videos I had it down. Our sewing machine dates to the 60s.

I can't wait to get her out on the water and test it out. Freetime is against me but i'll do it sometime soon.

Dennis i'm a VW nut, my van is a 1970 VW Westfalia, my Klepper is older than It by a good 5 years or so.

Thanks,
Matt

john allsop
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Location: isles of scilly UK

Re: Home made AKA for $5 bucks and my sailing parts.

Post by john allsop »

Really good, you showed the members how to do it and save a lot of money as your labour was free. The photos are dark but just enough can be seen, now for decent weather as spring is upon us, and you can get on the water, i,m sure we all want to see the system afloat, it can,t fail.

DLee
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Location: South Salem, NY
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Re: Home made AKA for $5 bucks and my sailing parts.

Post by DLee »

I have been Jonesing for a VW van for years now... but that's a project that will probably have to wait a bit. I'm afraid my days of vintage vehicles are over now. Too darned big, and parts are too expensive. Unlike boats...

Anyway, the rig is looking great. You should spend a little time figuring out your rigging now so that when you hit the water you'll be ready to go. You can easily lose hours to figuring out how lines are going to run, only to change it all up after you've tried it out.

Clamshells work really well when the angle of the line is low and parallel to the mounting plane. If you have an angle coming into the clamshell consider having a guide out in front of it. There are a lot of ways to rig the main sheet. Try them all... Think about raising and lowering the sails from your cockpit and how you want to do that. I've put my jib on a continuous loop with enough extra line to be able to pull it in and tuck it under the foredeck. It's going to be very important to be able to drop the sail quickly and efficiently out on the water. Less so with the outriggers; I forgot that.

Think about a tiller extension, it will make hiking out, standing up, and moving around the boat much easier. I usually install the foot peddles as well, as they would be positioned for solo paddling. When you're working on the sail or something in the front of the cockpit it's easy to reach down and steer with the foot peddles.

If you're planning on sailing without the outriggers you'll want to think about bailing tools. I use a 5 gallon canvas bucket - fantastically handy, sponge, hand pump and electric pump.

Anyway, it's sounds like your time out is precious - messing around with this stuff before you hit the water will save hours of time rigging on the beach.

d
Klepper Aerius II
Klepper T9
Long Haul MK1 Expedition 'light'
Klepper S4 sail rig
Kayaksailor 1.6 +genoa
BSD 36HP

DasBlauwal4

Re: Home made AKA for $5 bucks and my sailing parts.

Post by DasBlauwal4 »

Thanks for the enourgement guys. I'm really ancious to get on the water.

I had originally been planning on pulling the triger on a kayaksailor rig to learn on but then by chance came across my Klepper setup for a decent price so here i am. Knee deep in gear and projects!

Dennis, thanks for the advise and you are correct, I really need to learn my way around the rigging and setup of the system before heading out. I'm also re thinking my debut should be more lake oriented vs tidal river? I was thinking the Potomac river but will probably move inland to a recreational lake. I will have to drive to get there anyway I look at it.

Do you recomend the clamshell type with cams or the fixed narrow style? I have yet to get hardware for my deckboard.

Also I have a project in the works to fabricate tiller cables that are connected to a forward tiller and thus are parallel on the port and starboard for steering. Theres a mention of this in the folding kayaker.

Thanks,
Matt

DLee
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
Posts: 1444
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:05 pm
Location: South Salem, NY
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Re: Home made AKA for $5 bucks and my sailing parts.

Post by DLee »

Matt, I would probably stick with a lake the first time or two out. I started with the jib alone, then went to the main alone, then sailed the whole rig together. It is a bit of a learning curve - BUT, you have outriggers. I didn't. That makes a big difference. You are probably not going to capsize! I did, several times, and I'm glad I wasn't on a river - I would have never gotten back upstream... I think a nice recreational lake offers a safety net that's pretty alluring for the first sail.

I think the cam locks are great, but you really don't need them for the jib sheets. The wedge type work fine and I think they are considerably cheaper. You will want a guide in front of them though. The clam or cam-less cleats do have a tendency to catch the lines a lot. This probably won't happen with the cam lock cleats and that would be a good selling point to go that route. I use a cam lock for my main sheet and it has a built in guide. It works great. There are some old sailing posts where a fellow named Der Kapitan I think, was using a main sheet cam and block in a suspended form. I think this is a great idea - but the block unit is close to $100. The block is fastened suspended by lines between the deck and the boom. I guess the main sheet would act as the boom line and the deck line would be static to the block.

I have my halyards coming back to clam cleats on the control board as well so that I can drop the sails from the control board and not have to climb forward to the mast to make an adjustment. This works, but it's a lot of lines coming back to the control board with tension on them. Eventually the board loosens up and needs to be tightened back down. So there are alternatives to the control board - like mounting clam or regular cleats on the washboards for the jib sheets and using the hanging cam block for the main sheet - effectively eliminating the need for the board.

If you were going out without the outriggers I would suggest not worrying about the cleats and just hold the lines by hand until you got used to the handling. With the outrigger you will be able to sail the entire rig during your first outing - but I would still get there by adding one piece at a time. Just in case and you'll want to see how the boat responds to each sail alone before you put both sails up together... on not. Ha.

d
Klepper Aerius II
Klepper T9
Long Haul MK1 Expedition 'light'
Klepper S4 sail rig
Kayaksailor 1.6 +genoa
BSD 36HP

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