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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 2:52 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 4:10 pm
Posts: 163
Part 1 of 3

This past winter Ann and I took a three-week South Florida sailing trip in two Folbot GIIs. Ann has done this a lot. I'm a relative newbie. No fresh water available meant carrying many gallons with us. The GII payload handles all of this gear and water quite nicely. Balogh Sail Rigs with 32 square foot double-reef sails ease the task of moving these heavily laden barges.


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Ann and me
Folbots: Too many. It's embarrassing.
Feathercraft: Aeronaut
Klepper: AEI - Jonathan Waterman's boat
Hardshells x6


Last edited by RangerTim on Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 3:56 pm 
lord high faltbotmeister

Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2007 8:05 am
Posts: 820
Location: atlanta, georgia
Thanks for sharing that TIm. Looks like you guys were ready to find the Northwest passage with those rigs! Please tell us where you ventured? I am headed off on my 4th Keys trip late this October and am already stoked! Very tame trip planned, just a week down the water trail to Bahia Honda. There is nothing like that part of the world, imo.

Best,
g

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1990's A1 Expedition
2010 Klepper Quattro
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Balogh sail rig, 24 + 36 HP
Torqeedo outboard
1938 Sachs-Fichtel seitenbordmotor


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:14 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 4:10 pm
Posts: 163
Part 2 of 3

Reaching Paradise is the goal. Sometimes, though, Paradise is out of reach. A site is already occupied, Weather or health may curtail progress. In the land of no land, mangrove islands look inviting but may offer no place to put ashore. Ann came up with a solution--sleeping on board at anchor.

One must be protected from weather and bugs. Ann has come up with a shelter that works nicely. I thought some people might be interested in trying this, so instructions follow.

First, you will have packed such that the necessities for the next 16 hours are close at hand [Food, water, sleeping bag, Wagg bags, pee bottle or tight-lidded canister]. You will have installed three sections of 3" closed-cell foam [kayakoutfitting.com] in the bilge between the ribs. This will allow you comfort. Second, you will have stopped early enough in the day that the configuration can be switched from sailing to sleeping before the possible onslaught of mosquitoes and no-see-ums. Set the Bruce anchor [Bruce anchor holds pretty well and has no sharp points or edges that could be death to a skin-on-frame boat]. Lower the sail and swing it around to the foredeck, securing to perimeter line with a bungee or a string of cheap carabiners. Leave the lowest mast section in place. Stow the top and a middle mast section. Move gear stored in the cockpit to other places, like the aft deck or dangling from the perimeter lines and D-rings. You are ready to begin assembling the shelter.

Place the other middle Balogh mast section into delrin rings attached to the aft-most cockpit crossrib. If you lack delrin rings, several turns of onewrap velcro will work. Top each of the mast sections with a PVC elbow. Insert a length of schedule 80 pvc tubing between the elbows. This is the framework of your shelter.

Pull one end of the tubing out of the elbow and slide 4 or more heavy-duty plastic coathangers, the kind with a circle below the hook, onto the tubing. They will act as spreaders for the shelter. Their hooks will have been cut off. Your tubing will be of the diameter that the circles will slide over it. Replace tubing into elbow. [Note that a stick anchor, handy in the shallow waters of South Florida, can be substituted for the PVC tubing. In that case you will need one PVC elbow and one PVC tee]


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_________________
Ann and me
Folbots: Too many. It's embarrassing.
Feathercraft: Aeronaut
Klepper: AEI - Jonathan Waterman's boat
Hardshells x6


Last edited by RangerTim on Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:26 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:18 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 4:10 pm
Posts: 163
Part 3 of 3

Each coathanger will have two light lines dangling from the bottom, one at each corner. The other ends of these lines will have loops with tautline hitches. The loops go over the washboard star knobs, then they are tensioned. This provides wind resistance.

From a mesh bag remove the great gob of no-see-um mesh [REI, Seattle Fabrics] that you have fashioned to fit generously over the frame of your shelter. This will require cutting multiple sections to length, then joining them with seam tape. With a sharpie you will have labeled the mesh "bow" and "stern" at the points where the mesh rests on the PVC elbows. You will have folded and rolled the mesh so that it can be unrolled into position. You will have a bag of small metal clothespin-like clamps with plastic tips. [Home Depot, with their other woodworking clamps] These you can use to hold the mesh to the tensioning lines as you unroll, and will minimize mesh billowing in the wind.

The mesh will be tucked under a loop of shock cord [cable ties hold shock cord together quite well] stretched around the washboards and under the star knobs. Your mesh will have been fashioned with enough extra material to blouse over the sail, filling in gaps. The same will be true at the aft washboard section.

Okay, so the bugs cannot get in. What about rain? Purchase a lightweight nylon tarp [I cannot remember where we obtained ours] of the appropriate size. Each long side of this tarp will have been rolled toward the center, creating two sausages. The sausages will be held together by four lengths of line, tied in shoelace bows. Then the sausages will have been rolled or folded such that the tarp can be unfolded or unrolled beneath the mesh but on top of the PVC tubing. leaving the sausages intact. Untie the bows one at a time, retying them around the PVC tubing. Now your rain shelter is ready to deploy in the event you need it. When the rain threatens, the tarp sausages can be unrolled and tucked under the shock cord without displacing the no-see-um mesh. This is very important if the bugs are out, because most of the bugs that get inside your shelter will eventually bite you. Rain may get in at the ends, but surely you have brought a synthetic-fill sleeping bag.

Maybe this sounds all very complicated. Gathering all of the materials and preparing the mesh is a pain, I admit. But sleeping in the bilge of your boat, with fish and turtles bumping you in the night and dolphins huffing and puffing as they patrol, is an experience that makes the trouble worthwhile.

_________________
Ann and me
Folbots: Too many. It's embarrassing.
Feathercraft: Aeronaut
Klepper: AEI - Jonathan Waterman's boat
Hardshells x6


Last edited by RangerTim on Fri Aug 11, 2017 5:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:44 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 4:10 pm
Posts: 163
Greg, we were in Everglades NP and 10k Islands area. Yes, we carry a lot of stuff. I confess to being something of a gadgethead, so I carry a solar charging kit for charging VHF, GPS, tablet, waterproof cameras, phone, headlamps. We were independently outfitted in case we wanted to separate for some solitude.


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_________________
Ann and me
Folbots: Too many. It's embarrassing.
Feathercraft: Aeronaut
Klepper: AEI - Jonathan Waterman's boat
Hardshells x6


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:57 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:08 pm
Posts: 119
What a great report, and ambitious adventure. The smallest boat I ever cruised was a 20' sloop, though I dream and scheme of smaller adventures on thinner water. I have cruised in some quiet marshes along the ICW in a bigger boat. I also canoe sailed in Florida, my first attempt at canoe sailing 12+ years ago, but I stayed in a motel and day sailed the boat, also with a BSD rig.
Thank you for sharing your pics and camping methods.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 10:32 pm 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle

Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:05 pm
Posts: 1398
Location: South Salem, NY
Wow Tim this is really fantastic. I have long tried to figure out a good sleeping canopy for the kayak cockpit, it looks like you guys nailed it! Nice job. If you have room to carry a throwable life preserver cushion or two they can make great fillers for the gap between the ribs of the 'bilge.' I have also used foam pads (for camping) cut to size to help smooth out the bottom. I've never slept in my boat but it's on my list of things to do. Thanks for this.

Sounds like a great adventure. Please share more pictures.

d

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Klepper Aerius II
Klepper T9
Long Haul MK1 Expedition 'light'
Klepper S4 sail rig
Kayaksailor 1.6 +genoa
BSD 36HP


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 11:15 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 4:10 pm
Posts: 163
This is all Ann's doing, Dennis. I just duplicated what she designed. She is the sailor. Somehow, despite my mistakes and inefficiency, I manage to reach my destination.

I'm sure room for improvement exists in this system. At some point, though, you must say "good enough" and enjoy.

One challenge with a fully-loaded skin-on-frame is landing at a beach with surf. In the past I just land then frantically pitch gear ashore until the boat is light enough to crab walk it out of harms way. By the time I get enough gear out the boat is half full of water and sand.

What I plan to do next time is toss out the anchor just beyond the surf, then ease the boat toward shore. In about two or three feet of water I'll jump out and ferry gear to shore. The I'll return to the anchor, retrieve it, and hit the beach with a mostly empty boat.

_________________
Ann and me
Folbots: Too many. It's embarrassing.
Feathercraft: Aeronaut
Klepper: AEI - Jonathan Waterman's boat
Hardshells x6


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 8:27 am 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2017 3:08 pm
Posts: 119
I am new to folders, but I agree with your anchor off the beach plan. I have used it when day sailing boats too heavy to easily drag up and down.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 9:16 am 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 4:10 pm
Posts: 163
Cooking aboard is possible. We use Trangia stoves set atop the closed-cell foam. The heat does not transfer to the foam. One would want to become adept at lighting and dousing the flame before trying this.

Our seats are thermarest pads and a crazy creek type chair frame. Comfy and convenient.

We like the Garmin Montana GPS for its large screen. At one time it was sold as a marine bundle that included Bluecharts coastal US and part of coastal Canada. It mounts to the Balogh crosstube with a RAM EZ-Strap handlebar mount. The crosstube diameter is a bit too small for the mount to grip properly. A couple of winds of sticky back velcro loop around the crosstube solves that problem.

http://www.rammount.com/part/RAP-SB-187-GA46

_________________
Ann and me
Folbots: Too many. It's embarrassing.
Feathercraft: Aeronaut
Klepper: AEI - Jonathan Waterman's boat
Hardshells x6


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 1:16 am 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle

Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:05 pm
Posts: 1398
Location: South Salem, NY
Hey Tim, I was just revisiting your bug/rain canopy. Can you set that up while on the water inside the boat?

Do you have a link for the delrin rings that you're using to mount the stern upright for the tent?

I was also wondering about the closed cell foam... do you cover the entire bottom of the boat with this? and it's comfortable to scrabble around on?

Thanks

d

_________________
Klepper Aerius II
Klepper T9
Long Haul MK1 Expedition 'light'
Klepper S4 sail rig
Kayaksailor 1.6 +genoa
BSD 36HP


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 1:33 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 4:10 pm
Posts: 163
Yes, Dennis, the shelter can be set up while in the boat on the water. Having the no-see-um mesh and the tarp pre-rolled to easily unroll speeds the process. The loop of shock cord around the washboard perimeter is in place for the entire trip. I store the pvc conduit (or stick anchor) on deck under the deck rigging.

The delrin rings are a Folbot item. I imagine that they could be fashioned from marine plywood.

I use three sections of closed-cell foam between the crossribs. That is plenty long enough for my bed. This leaves the forward and aft areas fully available for gear storage. Hinges and tabs protrude upward from the Folbot keelsons. I use a hot knife attachment on a butane soldering iron to cut away foam so the foam chunks fit over the protrutions. To secure each chunk, I run a length of velcro one-wrap under the keelson and around the foam.

I stand on the foam all the time. After a night aboard I can stand and do stretches to work out the kinks. I can even run in place.

Erecting the shelter takes me 30-45 minutes after dropping anchor. This includes relocating gear that resides in the cockpit while under way and fine-tuning the no-see-um mesh to insure that all possible points of insect ingress have been blocked. Striking the shelter in the morning takes some time, too. One must be diligent about carefully rolling the tarp and no-see-um mesh so that they can be deployed easily the next time.

Note that If you have a mast for a 32 square foot Balogh sail, the lower mast section will be shorter than the middle mast sections. A spacer will be needed to extend the lower mast section so that the shelter ridge pole will be horizontal. I made an extension using scraps that Mad Dave at Balogh was kind enough to provide. Had that not been available I would have used pvc pipe.

I could use the two middle mast sections for the shelter uprights and not need a spacer. However, this would mean more work in the morning. I would need to thread the lower mast section through the sail hoops. I would rather use a spacer.

The mast for a 38 square foot Balogh sail has a lower mast section more-or-less equal in length to the middle mast sections.

_________________
Ann and me
Folbots: Too many. It's embarrassing.
Feathercraft: Aeronaut
Klepper: AEI - Jonathan Waterman's boat
Hardshells x6


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 11:57 am 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle

Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:05 pm
Posts: 1398
Location: South Salem, NY
Thanks!

I may consider swapping my 'sailing deck' for the foam. Especially for transport.

I was reading the above thinking "@%&$, that guys got some serious balance..." (which I'm sure you do), but then the realization hit, you've got the outriggers extended for all this stuff correct?

d

_________________
Klepper Aerius II
Klepper T9
Long Haul MK1 Expedition 'light'
Klepper S4 sail rig
Kayaksailor 1.6 +genoa
BSD 36HP


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 3:12 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 4:10 pm
Posts: 163
Yes, the outriggers are in place when anchored for the night.

_________________
Ann and me
Folbots: Too many. It's embarrassing.
Feathercraft: Aeronaut
Klepper: AEI - Jonathan Waterman's boat
Hardshells x6


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