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PostPosted: Wed Oct 07, 2009 5:32 am 
Thanks Tom for your complete and beautifully detailed description.

Is there some reason why you do not lay the hull flat to glue the tube sheathes? Seems like it would be easier to work with and line up that way.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 07, 2009 8:47 am 
Quote:
Is there some reason why you do not lay the hull flat to glue the tube sheathes?


I considered doing it that way, but was more interested in trying it reversed on the frame. Next time perhaps....
However, what seems like a better solution is quite often not the case. Tom


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 09, 2009 4:29 pm 
Here's a pic of the 18oz hull with stems sealed and frame tubes inserted. The Sonnet double hull
is stiffer than the Sonnet single due to additional stringers and heavier keel. Like the Sonnet singles,
there are no rigid cross sections and the 4 side stringers are free standing with no connections at the
bow and stern.

Cross brace tubes are duct taped to stringers in pic below for trial fitting. When completed, they will be
hinged for folding. Paddlers will have their backrests at the side brace tubes and will be 5.5ft apart for initial
on water testing.

The Deck will be 10oz PVC. The 32" X 16" aluminum coamings will be 3/8" tubing. Adjustable footbraces
will be keel mounted. Length is 15.5' X 26" beam X 10.5" hull depth. The boat minus deck is about
25 lbs or so. I'd estimate 35lbs total when completed.

Based on the 10 minute Sonnet 16 assembly time, the Sonnet Combi assembly should be less than
15 minutes.

Tom

The frame consists of a keel, 4 side stringers , and 4 cross brace tubes.... Simple is as simple does :D
Image


Last edited by Yostwerks on Tue Oct 27, 2009 3:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 6:38 pm 
A friend and I took a short spin in the Sonnet Combi prototype today at a pond next to my house. I wanted to check on paddler placement
and waterline before adding the deck. I glued on a few narrow PVC straps to pull the top sponsons in a bit to approximate the profile when
the deck is attached.

This small 15.5' X 26" kayak rides plenty high in spite of it's 400+lb load ( paddlers / gear / boat ). It appears that 500+ lbs
will be no problem, and is what I was hoping for. Paddlers are over 5ft apart, and the low point of the hull at the center is about 1.5
sponsons deep at the waterline. Fore and aft, the induced rocker floats the stems at about a one sponson waterline.

Stability is very good as is tracking. Turning is very quick . Overall, it performs well, and should make a good lightweight folding double or
high volume single that assembles with little effort in under 15 minutes. I'll add a deck tomorrow and we'll take the boat out in some wind
and waves on wednesday to see how it handles. I have yet to paddle it solo... as I didn't make a center seat yet.

The Sonnet Combi weighs 29 lbs, and that indicates that it should be about 40lbs with 10oz deck, lightweight coamings, and rigging.

Cheers, Tom


Last edited by Yostwerks on Fri Oct 23, 2009 6:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:46 pm 
If you built a four tube Sonnet using four 16 ft tubes, would you make the bow and stern in similar form to the Combi rather than raked?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:59 pm 
Quote:
If you built a four tube Sonnet using four 16 ft tubes, would you make the bow and stern in similar form to the Combi rather than raked?


No... I'd likely opt for 16 top / 15 bottom... or a raked (sloped) 16 / 16 setup with 4 sponsons. Folbot can probably still can get you 15 footers.


Tom


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 12:16 pm 
In that case, I think I'll order the 16 footers and fold and tape the ends to make 15 footers. That way I will have more flexibility of design for whatever may come. Unless you have any other ideas....


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 8:53 am 
Quote:
In that case, I think I'll order the 16 footers and fold and tape the ends to make 15 footers. That way I will have more flexibility of design for whatever may come. Unless you have any other ideas....


Do whatever you think is best.

Tom


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 9:45 pm 
Torture time again :shock:

We took the Sonnet Combi out for a couple hours today at Chatfield Reservoir. The reservoir is at 6,000ft and we drove down from 9,000ft.
The sponsons were near full inflation when we left Bailey, but when we arrived they were nearly deflated. The reverse is true heading back
home, so the sponsons are left about half full to avoid being over-inflated on the way up the hill.

The deck has been attached ( glued) though no coamings or rigging are yet in place. The removable coamings will be made from lightweight
aluminum tubing similar to the Sonnet 16.

Here's several pics from today. The boat glides well, is easily driven, and holds good speed for such a short double. This boat performs
like a non folding SOF in spite of it's inflatable / folder design. Nat liked it so much he plans to build one for his family. He currently has 5
kayaks.....Tom

The Thule J-carriers are a good fit for the 3 sponson per side Sonnet. We drove up to 70 mph with no problems.
Image

All dressed up and ready for a paddle... I always enjoy testing a new design.... especially a lightweight inflatable... A rare bird if I do say so myself. 8)
Image

Forward deck...
Image

Aft deck...
Image

Nat paddles on the lake... The deck has no structure for support, and is held taut by the top sponsons flexing outward.
Image

On the river ( S.Platte)
Image

A flock of Pelicans enjoying a nice autumn day with the Rocky Mountain foothills in the background.
Image


Last edited by Yostwerks on Fri Oct 16, 2009 11:13 am, edited 7 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 9:05 am 
Quote:
The deck has no structure for support, and is held tight by the top sponsons flexing outward.


Gorgeous boat, and impressive how the deck maintains its shape with so little structure.

Do you think this design might handle a Klepper style open cockpit?


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 10:27 am 
Quote:
Gorgeous boat, and impressive how the deck maintains its shape with so little structure. Do you think this design might handle a
Klepper style open cockpit?


Thanks.... When prepping for deck attachment, duct tape is placed every foot or so across the open hull , and used to pull the top fully
inflated sponson slightly past the desired beam at any given point. The deck skin "blank" is then trimmed and used to mark the
deck outline on the hull ( top sponson).

The duct tape is removed from the hull , and the deck skin ( pre-glued 1.5" along with the top of hull) is taped along the outline on one side
of the kayak. On the other side, the deck skin is pulled hard until it reached the outline drawn previously where duct tape is attached to
hold it in place. This forces the sponsons into a reflex mode. Next, a heatgun is used to reactivate the glue while hand pressure is applied
to secure the bond which is nearly instantaneous.

In use, inflating the sponsons fully , along with the cross brace tubes pushing the aluminum stringers outward, stretches the deck taut.
The symbiotic relationship between sponsons and tubes, all under tension, makes the Sonnet's what they are.

For carrying heavier gear on the deck, it's easy to support the load with small aluminum tubes flattened on the ends to wedge
between the deck and sponsons. A small sleeve can be added under the deck if desired.

A Klepper style washboard coaming should work ok. For greater support, it should follow the inside edge of the top sponson.

Also note that the keel is free floating and not attached to any frame members. Two small velcroed PVC loops on the hull floor keep it from
moving sideways. When constructed the hull has a flat bottom, but with 400 lbs aboard, it assumes a "V" shape with about 10 degrees of
deadrise ( keel to chine slope) resulting in excellent tracking.

On the shape shifting Sonnet's... "The total is greater than the sum of it's parts" :wink:

Have fun building your's.....Tom


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 5:39 pm 
The coamings were attached the other day so here's a few pics of the setup. A 10oz PVC sleeve with a drawstring folds
and tightens around the removable 2-piece X 1/2" aluminum tube coamings.

Also included are pics of a triangluar shaped HDPE support used for entering the boat. It snaps on the keel just behind the
cross braces and supports the paddlers hands and weight when lowering into the kayak. Otherwise, the paddler in pushing
down directly on the sponsons as there are no hard gunwales for support. Exiting the boat doesn't require the HDPE support
in most conditions.

On problem I encountered was finding a way to paddle this boat as a properly balanced single. The balance point for a
single use third coaming overlaps the front of the aft 32" coaming. I solved this by simply sitting near the front of the
rear coaming on a third seat plate, and attaching the spray skirt backwards. I reckon I'll be adding a single hinged cross
brace tube for back support.

This kayak is as a simple as I could make it, and with as few parts as possible. I weighed the completed boat today and it's
right at 36 lbs. Not bad for a 500lb displacement double. The first assembly took less than 15 low effort minutes. Inflating
the 6 Folbot sponsons takes about 3 - 4 minutes of that time.

I've built nearly 40 kayaks over the years, but none are as unique and rewarding as the simple Sonnet's. When we motorcycle tour
New Zealand's South Island next year, this is the boat we'll be paddling. .... Cheers, Tom

The 1/2" X 2 piece coamings are connected at the center by a 3/8" insert
Image

The 10oz PVC sleeve folds around the aluminum coaming and tightens with a drawstring.
Image

A sea sock, spray skirt, or travel cover attach over the aluminum coaming.
Image

The 1/2" HDPE entry support
Image

The support snaps onto the keel, and is held in place by the deck skin. It's not absolutely necessary, but makes entry easier for the paddler and the sponsons :D
Image


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2009 5:15 am 
Quote:
Also included are pics of a triangluar shaped HDPE support used for entering the boat. It snaps on the keel just behind the
cross braces and supports the paddlers hands and weight when lowering into the kayak. Otherwise, the paddler in pushing
down directly on the sponsons as there are no hard gunwales for support. Exiting the boat doesn't require the HDPE support
in most conditions.


Is this a feature that you might want in the single Sonnets for entering and exiting in rougher conditions?


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2009 8:38 am 
Quote:
Is this a feature that you might want in the single Sonnets for entering and exiting in rougher conditions?


For the single, I sometimes use a block of 3" closed cell foam.

Tom


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 1:11 pm 
Hi all,

Here's a few pics of the Sonnet Double broken down and packed for transport , plus one of the forward deck rigging.
There are many homebuilt kayaks around but precious few are folders with fewer still being inflatable / folders ......Cheers, Tom

Everything layed out on the table. It was 5 degrees yesterday morning at my place, so a wood fire is mandatory.
Image

"Simple is as simple does" :roll: ...4 side stringers, keel, 2 coamings, and 2 seats. The PVC skin folded size is 27" X 15" X 11" and weighs 17.5lbs.
Each stringer is held together by a shock cord running inside the tubes.
Image

Paddling gear gets packed with the boat. This is not meant to be all gear needed, just a demonstration of the compact nature of this kayak.
Image

Ready for loading in the car. Total packed weight 49 lbs. including all the paddling gear seen above.
Image

A tight fit in the Porsche's rear trunk... and still room for a second folder in the front trunk. Those Germans are so clever :)
This boat is plenty small enough for motorcycle transport also. In that event, paddling gear is often carried in the panniers and top box.
Image

Not exactly kayaking weather.... My 9,000ft elevation shop is in the background. With 10" of snow forecast for tonight I'd better quit playing and get the
chains on my truck for plowing.
Image

Forward deck rigging and carry handle. The completed Sonnet Double weighs 37lbs.
Image


Last edited by Yostwerks on Sat Oct 31, 2009 10:45 am, edited 1 time in total.

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