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PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 3:41 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 9:02 pm
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Location: Astoria, OR
Chris wrote: This Deven stove... is it anywhere online? Saying that it is sold through a West Coast paddlers' group leaves it sort-of out in left field for me.

Guy's name is Daren, not Deven. West Coast Paddler is here: http://www.westcoastpaddler.com/community/index.php

This is what happens if you type West Coast Paddler into Google: http://tinyurl.com/2md6l6

I bet Google would also work for a lot of other imponderables for you, Chris.

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Astoria, OR
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 4:29 pm 
Quote:
I really don't understand all Alex's fuss about the supposed inconvenience of picking up a couple of handfuls of leaves and twigs. I wouldn't try to use it for a trip above the tree line.

There was NO twigs. Only figs (no pun intended), and occasionally dried palm foliage - this was what I had to use. You can't make a supper and breakfast on a couple handfuls of leaves and twigs, anyway. It takes about 6-8 times more than that, even with Sierra. A cup of tea - may be, yes.

Quote:
In Japan, I would only use a canister [LPG] stove-- they're just too convenient.

Ditto, - in most of other places. Compact and convenient.

Quote:
This Deven stove... is it anywhere online?

Like it's been said - it's Darren. Go to their forum, Buy and Sell section, and 5th or 6th entry in the index is this stove, with photos and descriptions.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 4:42 pm 
knight of the folding kayak realm

Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 1:26 am
Posts: 350
Location: Republic of V.I.
Chris, go to westcoastpaddling, as Dave and Alex said, and ask for DarenN and his Mark I wood stoves.

By the way, they spread into your continent rapidly. Westcoastwilli from Vienna has two of them and had the opportunity to test them in S. Alps this very last weekend. He's a frequent visitor on this forum and may respond with report.

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Klondike, Nimbus Telkwa


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 8:35 am 
knight of the folding kayak realm

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 1:06 pm
Posts: 359
Location: Spruce Head, Maine
Anyone familiar with the Bush Buddy Ultra wood stove?

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin ... stove.html

or

http://bushbuddy.ca/


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 12:59 pm 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:47 pm
Posts: 1709
Location: Arlington, VA (i.e. Wash DC)
While those look like excellent devices, I'll stick with the wood-efficient Zzip. The design with the fan makes it special, whereas the other items are basically little fireplaces (that sounds a little negative or belittleing, and I don't mean it to be-- they really do like neat devices).

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Chris T.
~'91 Klepper A2 w/ BSD schooner rig.
'64 Klepper Passat/Tradewind and T12 restoration projects.
Non-folding: '84 Hobie 16; early '90s Old Town Canoe.
Previously owned '04 Pakboat Puffin II and '05 Swift.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 3:37 pm 
Paul wrote:
Anyone familiar with the Bush Buddy Ultra wood stove?

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin ... stove.html

or

http://bushbuddy.ca/

Looks like downscaled version of Sierra (1" shorter, 1 " narrower), and without fan. And costs 3 times more. I don't mind paying more for something really much better, but in this case I doubt it is much better. Fan is what makes Sierra economic and powerful enough, at the same time. In theory, fan is a weak point, but in practice it seldom fails and if it fails then you just keep the shutter of Sierra open and it becomes one of those "little fireplaces", - stoves with natural air flow. This is something that Sierra owners should remember (I learned it hard way) - keep the shutter open even if fan or battery is dead.

One more thing to remember - salt water (and any water, if soaked for long time) can damage that fan. I'm not talking about rain. Even a real dip or two in a sea water won't kill it, but eventually it starts corroding. Keep it in drybag or in some relatively dry nook of the boat.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 6:04 pm 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:47 pm
Posts: 1709
Location: Arlington, VA (i.e. Wash DC)
Very well put on both points, Alex.

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Chris T.
~'91 Klepper A2 w/ BSD schooner rig.
'64 Klepper Passat/Tradewind and T12 restoration projects.
Non-folding: '84 Hobie 16; early '90s Old Town Canoe.
Previously owned '04 Pakboat Puffin II and '05 Swift.


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 Post subject: hijaking
PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 2:15 pm 
Wow. I really hijacked this thread, didn't I? What started as a simple "What's a convenient stove for loacl weekend trips" questions has devolved into an in-depth discussion of alcohol and wood stoves.

By the way, my Kelly Kettle does indeed boil its 2.5 pints with two handfuls of twigs. Actually, once you've boiled the first load and have the fire going well it takes little more to boil each 2.5 pint increment from there on. Doubt it not. I just lived that way for a week.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 5:24 pm 
Quote:
"What's a convenient stove for loacl weekend trips" questions has devolved into an in-depth discussion of alcohol and wood stoves.

None of the above, - for me ;-) ... 'cause none is really convenient, compared to LPG. But wooden and alcohol stoves have been around for centuries, fuel usually isn't a problem, and they are very simple and therefore reliable, that's why make a good backup.

Quote:
By the way, my Kelly Kettle does indeed boil its 2.5 pints with two handfuls of twigs.

I need more substantial hot meal than a cup of tea or two. Usually it's rice or buckwheat, both need simmering about 18 minutes, and cups of tea or cold cranberry drink (from dried berries, and water needs to be boiled first) can reach really impressive numbers when it's hot or there is not much else to do. Also, when those "twigs" are dried palm leaves or dried tops of reed from the river, it takes a lot of them. Since I needed fuel for both supper and breakfast, I've ended up with a sack made of a t-shirt, half-full of those "plam/reed twigs', and not much of that remained after the breakfast.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 6:22 pm 
faltbootemeister

Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 2:00 pm
Posts: 210
Location: River Danube, Austria
Just got back form a backcountry hike, we had DarreNs Mark I stove with ous and used it for the first time.

Originally i was using the trailstove,

http://www.trailstove.com/

but found its round design quite space consuming in the kayak and backpack.

after several posts on http://www.westcoastpaddler.com Darren came out with his square design:

http://www.westcoastpaddler.com/communi ... .php?t=885

and here:

http://www.westcoastpaddler.com/communi ... php?t=1041

you can even take it apart!

here are some fotos from last weekend:

Image

Image

Image

Image

To add more oxygen i am using a piece of steeltube and a plastic hose.

Image

works even better than the fan form sierra stove!

servus

willi

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1960 Klepper T9 (turned into a bookshelf)
1987 Pouch RZ85
1998 Prijon Seayak
2002 Seaward Gemini Tandem
2005 Feathercraft Big Kahuna
2006 Feathercraft K1
2010 Feathercraft Wisper XP


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:58 am 
Being a stove freak I own just about all of those mentioned in the thread already, or similar plus a few more. Alcohol stoves are the darling of the ultralight backpackers. I have a beautiful ultralight stove that is adjustable, made from old aluminum cans. I have a Markill stove that is better than the Zzip stove, I also own several MSR stoves as well as a Kelly Kettle. Each has it's own attributes. The question was "Which is the best for weekend use" Hands down for me is the gas canister stove for sheer convenience. My personal favorite being the MSR hanging stove, it boils a liter of water in 3 mins, simmers well and does not use all that much fuel. My alcohol stove would take at least 7mins to do the same. With much wind you will be lucky to get a boil at all with any alcohol stove. For windy conditions the Kelly is great if you have some fuel and just want boiling water, though I have looked at the Simmerette and like the look of it a lot!
If I were buying a new stove today for weekend use then the new Primus Eta is what I would purchase with it's cookset. A little bulky, but very, very nice.

Barry[/i]


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:39 pm 
Quote:
The question was "Which is the best for weekend use" Hands down for me is the gas canister stove for sheer convenience.

Yes. They are THE most convenient. I don't know how many times this mantra has to be repeated to eventually "sink" in minds...

Quote:
With much wind you will be lucky to get a boil at all with any alcohol stove.

Windscreen is essential and usually missing part of almost all commercial stoves (except for Sierra Zipp and similar wood-burning designs, of course - its body is the screen in itself). Alcohol stove Mini Trangia has a terrible windscreen - it's just a pot-stand with very little protection of the flame or of the actual pot.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 3:01 pm 
Bazzer wrote:
Being a stove freak I own just about all of those mentioned in the thread already, or similar plus a few more. Alcohol stoves are the darling of the ultralight backpackers. I have a beautiful ultralight stove that is adjustable, made from old aluminum cans. I have a Markill stove that is better than the Zzip stove, I also own several MSR stoves as well as a Kelly Kettle. Each has it's own attributes. The question was "Which is the best for weekend use" Hands down for me is the gas canister stove for sheer convenience. My personal favorite being the MSR hanging stove, it boils a liter of water in 3 mins, simmers well and does not use all that much fuel. My alcohol stove would take at least 7mins to do the same. With much wind you will be lucky to get a boil at all with any alcohol stove. For windy conditions the Kelly is great if you have some fuel and just want boiling water, though I have looked at the Simmerette and like the look of it a lot!
If I were buying a new stove today for weekend use then the new Primus Eta is what I would purchase with it's cookset. A little bulky, but very, very nice.

Barry[/i]

I might add that as a full time Fly Fishing Guide I use a stove in my drift boat many days during the winter. I have a Jetboil stove and coffee press. What do I think of it? Cr+p, in my opinion. Mine, which has been replaced, does not like to light in damp conditions, so it' going on Ebay soon. I have a Markill Stormy which I have had for 20 years, it's still the best for a brew in the boat, not much good for cooking on though. There is a new MSR stove that should have been available months ago, the Reactor, I would like to try one if MSR ever get around to making it available. But, as I wrote in my previous post, the MSR Dragonfly will do just about everything, only con about it is that it's a little fiddly to set up, but a great all round stove.

Go for gas for your weekend trips, there are plenty out there and don't worry about weight if you are carrying it in your Kayak. Come to think of it, there is no reason why you can't boil some water for tea on the deck of my K1 when afloat, just need some kind of platform for it and tie down....Mhhh?

Barry


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 4:38 pm 
Bazzer wrote:
Go for gas for your weekend trips, there are plenty out there and don't worry about weight if you are carrying it in your Kayak. Come to think of it, there is no reason why you can't boil some water for tea on the deck of my K1 when afloat, just need some kind of platform for it and tie down....Mhhh?

The guy from the original post (Greg) has already bought alcohol Mini Trangia (in addition to wood-burning stove), I can understand some reasons - it's often more about personal likes or dislikes than convenience of use. You're right about weight - in a kayak this isn't a concern at all. What weight - 11 oz MSR LPG cartridge?... It lasts more than a week, btw, if used in the same manner as people use their alcohol stoves. Smaller LPG cartridge, good for 3-4 days, weighs 4 oz. Liquid fuel with bottle for those stoves that you mentioned (white gas etc) weighs more, but still nothing to worry about. Like somebody has already said, these numbers, compared to weight of alcohol fuel and stove, make sense only for ultralight backpacker.

The aspect of using a stove in a kayak afloat is interesting. I think the level of risk (with LPG or white gas stove) would be approximately the same as in tent, - i.e. too high. More open space in a kayak, but addtiinal risk of flipping it over in a rocking boat. I wouldn't do this even after many hours without a hot meal, as long as I have some drinking water and cold snack to fill my stomach. Too much risk. Alcohol stove appears to me even more dangerous in this particular application. In a small power boat with more stability, more room and less flammable materials around - many stoves could be used, sure, why not...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 1:13 pm 
For one or two days why bother with a stove at all? I have just purchased some self heating meals from my local sports store, a little heavy, but of no concern when kayak camping.

The big problem with wood burning stoves is that the pots get black with soot, and this in turn will rub off on anything that you pack the pots with. Yes you can clean them, but that's a big hassle compared to using gas.

Barry


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