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PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2007 8:41 am 
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Location: Astoria, OR
Posting this list of problems a friend experienced with this cart. He is a bit of a cheapskate, and would not consider the Paddleboy Heavy Lifter. I think this cart has been discussed here before, under a different name. The friend prefers to remain anonymous.

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I purchased one of the Eckla Atlantic 200 kayak carts about one year ago to use with my double kayak here in Florida.

I thought you might be interested in some of the problems I see in this unit, and perhaps convey some of these concerns to the manufacturer.

1. Except for the anodized aluminum, the rest of the hardware used in this cart is of quickly rusting/ corroding material. So I had to replace the cotter pins that provide stops on inside of each wheel axle. Also, the bolts through the axles needed to be replaced. I replaced all with stainless steel fittings, which are easily found. (For use in water, the manufacturer should have used stainless steel fittings for these parts.)

2. Worse were the tires. (My cart has the pneumatic 8" tires.) The filler nozzles (stems) on each tire corroded off and the tires went flat. So the inner tubes had to be replaced. It is very difficult to find such small inner tubes. And it is almost impossible to pry small tires off a plastic hub without damaging the hub. Equally difficult to install new tube with that angled nozzle, and then get the tire back on without damaging the new tube. I managed only ruining one of the new tubes. But the plastic rims are now deeply scarred and I doubt they'll survive a future tube change.

3. Strapping the cart to the kayak. As you know, the rear of a kayak tapers away from the direction of pull. No matter how tight you fasten both straps, the slightest resistance pulls the kayak forward in the loops, and the wheels collapse or come off. Something is needed to anchor the straps FORWARD.

4. The spring clips that fasten the wheels to the axle are great, and convenient. But again, the metal is quickly corroding. I've been looking for a replacement in Stainless Steel. The obvious choice would be those pins with the retracting balls at the end. But they only work in round holes. The ECKLA manufacturer, although their supplied clips have round shafts, made these holes SQUARE with some kind of a punch. So my proposed solution won't work.

On a more positive note, I do find the cart useful when all functions well. It's just disappointing to encounter problems so soon in something that was fairly expensive, and, with water usage the intended use, should have been anticipated by the manufacturer.

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Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
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Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2007 1:33 pm 
knight of the folding kayak realm

Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 1:26 am
Posts: 350
Location: Republic of V.I.
krudave's friend wrote:

3. Strapping the cart to the kayak. As you know, the rear of a kayak tapers away from the direction of pull. No matter how tight you fasten both straps, the slightest resistance pulls the kayak forward in the loops, and the wheels collapse or come off. Something is needed to anchor the straps FORWARD.



This problem is a nobrainer. I, too like to strap the wheels towards the stern of my double Klondike for better control while towing, especially in difficult terrain. I wrap under tubing and over deck (twice) in one continuous loop a 15' strap, ending up with the buckle in the centre of the deck closer to the front of the kayak. I then tighten the strap, making sure that the buckle is at the centre (on the top of ridge pole.) Loose end of the strap goes now to the cockpit, where I fasten it tightly to the stern rib, making sure that there is no slack towards the buckle. the knot at the rib does not have to be anything fancy; I'd say that just the friction of the strap wrapped around a few times will do the job.

I will post pictures of the setup later in the spring, after returning from our winter holidays in Apache Junction.

Dave, recommend your friend to use Paddleboy Heavylifter. It is a high quality piece of equipment that has worked very well for me.

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gregn

Klondike, Nimbus Telkwa


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2007 6:08 pm 
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greg wrote: Dave, recommend your friend to use Paddleboy Heavylifter. It is a high quality piece of equipment that has worked very well for me.

Did that. Also told him it was the consensus favorite of a lot of folder owners. But, he does not hear things he does not want to.

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Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
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Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2007 11:23 pm 
I don't remember how this Eckla looks. Probably not the same as Paddleboy Heavylifter or Paddleboy Nemo.

Btw, Nemo is absolutely identical to Heavylifter, only with frame of aluminum (vs stainless steel on Heavylifter). This aluminum does not corrode, weighs less, and as I've found, strong enough for 90-100 lbs kayak, not to mention lighter boats.

Yes, straps need to go around some rib or simply put behind the rear end of the cockpit rim. As to where place the strap - midcart (and, naturally, its strap) needs to be placed close to the center of mass, wherever it is. In singles this CM is close to the seat backrest. In long boats it may be difficult to lift the bow high enough so that the cart would go under the CM, and then it could be a little fore of the CM. This is fine, as long as the strap still goes behind the cockpit. Too close to bow, and the boat will drag the stern, too close to stern, and your hands will feel more weight.

One more thing about Paddleboy - its cradle is too shallow for mono-keelsen FC boats, so the boat rests on one side TAD, which doesn't contribute to stability of the cart. It works with FC, but better suits hardshells, double-keel Folbots and wooden frames.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:24 am 
lord high faltbotmeister
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Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2007 6:30 pm
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Location: Stone Mountain, Ga. U.S.A.
Just returned from a three day trip to Florida. We used my pvc cart based somewhat on ALM's design and his ideas for wheels ( discussed elsewhere ). It was a complete success. I'll post pictures later, but to say briefly, it has no rustable parts. It is made entirely of PVC schedule 40 pipe, aluminum axle, stainless steel hardware and cloth webbing.

It carried my kahuna with 65 lbs of gear fine and my wife's heavier Cape Horn 150 plastic boat with a load of gear as well. Pulling a loaded boat with a midway cart is a breeze. We also have room to carry it once it is broken down at the launch point.

Chris

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