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PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 1:38 pm 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:47 pm
Posts: 1712
Location: Arlington, VA (i.e. Wash DC)
And I prefer my one-pound tarp, which was made by Go-lite but is out of production. You can make the exact same tarp, though, with the kit from here:
http://www.ray-way.com/tarp-nettent/index.shtml

I've been through several storms in this, including snow, and it's terrific. I wouldn't take it for "winter camping", though-- it's a mid-Spring to mid-Autumn affair.

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Chris T.
~'91 Klepper A2 w/ BSD schooner rig.
'64 Klepper Passat/Tradewind and T12 restoration projects.
Non-folding: '84 Hobie 16; early '90s Old Town Canoe.
Previously owned '04 Pakboat Puffin II and '05 Swift.


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 Post subject: tent
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 2:00 pm 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle

Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2005 3:40 pm
Posts: 1077
Location: isles of scilly UK
At 70 I prefer a tent. The vango I mentioned is called force 10 (not force 8 ) they now cost 400-500 eureo,s depending on size, I just checked, not cheap, but if looked after they last. It,s just the pegs which gave me problems on rock.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 2:08 pm 
You are right, this is not the tent for hiking, though it was beginning 50s. I will use it when i go for a small trip to one larger lake where i plan to stay for one week or so.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 2:25 pm 
I have the Eureka mountain pass 2 xtc. For the money it's an excellent tent. It packs down very well, and is reasonably light with a full coverage rain fly. I spent a fairly comfortable night in it with high winds at 11k feet. It has served me well on many snowy, rainy, and beautiful nights.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:43 pm 
John: yes, i'd seen the Vango 10, one it is currently listed here http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?%20ViewItem&item=150105524245&fromMakeTrack=true. Lookes great! Styling is similar to the Klepper. Bought a second tent, a cotton oldschool Pouch (Eastern Germany) from 1990, looking forward to receive.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:45 pm 
http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=150105524245&fromMakeTrack=true


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2007 12:04 am 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 4:47 pm
Posts: 1712
Location: Arlington, VA (i.e. Wash DC)
Tents have their place, but in the seasons I mentioned the tarp is drier and more comfortable-- also closer to nature and lighter.

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Chris T.
~'91 Klepper A2 w/ BSD schooner rig.
'64 Klepper Passat/Tradewind and T12 restoration projects.
Non-folding: '84 Hobie 16; early '90s Old Town Canoe.
Previously owned '04 Pakboat Puffin II and '05 Swift.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 10:23 pm 
chrstjrn wrote:
Tents have their place, but in the seasons I mentioned the tarp is drier and more comfortable-- also closer to nature and lighter.


I'm still debating between camping or pubing (?) for my upcoming Euro kayaking marathon. Camping could seriously reduce my trip overhead. How do you feel about tarps and summer canal touring?

-Andreas


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2007 12:29 am 
knight of the folding kayak realm

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 1:06 pm
Posts: 359
Location: Spruce Head, Maine
The idea of tarp camping is appealing to me, but what about the bugs and crawling critters? Once you start attaching mesh netting to fend them off you bascially are back in the realm of two walled tents. The other thing is that many tents these days already have a ton of mesh, and are much easier and faster to set up than a multipoint tarp. What is the benefit of the tarp system given these drawbacks? If I could just be more of a man and not be bothered when something crawls into my hair while I'm sleeping, things would be a lot less complicated.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2007 6:29 am 
lord high faltbotmeister
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Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2005 4:55 am
Posts: 575
Location: Dumfries, SW Scotland
Do tarps depend on trees? Not everywhere has them... Where I live, once the river takes you out of the city, it's bordered by agricultural land. Fences or hedges, crops or grass + animals. Very occasional groups of trees near the water, mostly on land unsuitable for farming, e.g. steeply sloping - you might get a tarp up, but you'd need to combine it with a hammock for sleeping. And such uncultivated patches tend to be full of stinging nettles and/or wild blackberry shrubs, nature's barbed wire. "Wild" camping is not legal in England, but if I were going to try it, I'd go for a green tent plus a groundsheet, and try to find a level spot by a hedge.

The legal way is to use organised camp sites. There are lots, but not always conveniently by a river - most of their customers arrive by road.

Wild camping is legal in Scotland, with a few sensible restrictions to stop you pitching in somebody's garden or damaging crops.

Mary

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2007 6:54 am 
knight of the folding kayak realm

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 1:06 pm
Posts: 359
Location: Spruce Head, Maine
Mary,

If there are no trees one would need to have their own poles-- trekking poles are often used--to set up a tarp.

Paul


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2007 6:58 am 
Quote:
"Wild" camping is not legal in England,


I was uncertain of this, but why am I not surprised. It just joins no right of paddling on most rivers. I bought a Hennesey Hammock last year and I've yet to use it (other than in my garden!). Perhaps a move to Scotalnd should be considered.

Thanks, for the info, Mary.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2007 7:20 am 
Site Admin

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 12:34 pm
Posts: 1713
Location: Southeast Michigan
I have two Hennessey Hammocks. They're lighter than any tent, and probably lighter than a tarp and foam mattress, too, as well as being far more comfortable. If there are trees where you're camping they're hard to beat.

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Michael Edelman
FoldingKayaks.org Webmaster


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2007 7:21 am 
The tree thing is why I've not seriously considered purchasing a hammock for camping (may not always want to camp where they're available). I'm guessing paddle halves and trekking poles would not suffice. On the other hand, in this part of the world, trees tend to be pretty abundant. C.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2007 7:22 am 
Site Admin

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2005 12:34 pm
Posts: 1713
Location: Southeast Michigan
Some folks have rigged the Hennessey as a tent when no trees are available. Kind of defeats the purpose, though. Check their website.

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Michael Edelman
FoldingKayaks.org Webmaster


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