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PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:30 pm 
I think I found inexpensive source of protein in long trips.

1) Pork Sung (Pork Floss, Shredded Dry Pork etc):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rousong. Sold in 12 oz cans in Chinese food supermarkets (yes, we have Chinese supermarkets in Vancouver, but try to find a European one)! I divide it into 4 portions and put each into a small ziplock bag, so it would make one 3 oz portion - enough for one meal for one person. Costs from $5 US per 12 oz. Needs no cooking, just make sure there is enough water in rice, soup etc to mix this stuff in (it absorbs water, naturally). A little too sweet to my taste, can't do anything about this. More "diarrhetic" than beef jerky (don't confuse this with diuretic - I didn't need anything diuretic in desert climate of Baja).

2) Beef Jerky. Available in many stores, though the cheapest in Vancouver I found in a Chinese store again. Also sweet. Sometimes it says "5 flavors", but it is always sweet. Sold in 10 oz or 12 oz boxes, from $8 per 10 oz box. The box is big, but let this not deter you. Discard the box. Inside you'll find the content divided in 2 compact sealed polyethylene bags, (heavy-grade polyethylene, much stronger than regular ziplock bags), each contains 5 or 6 oz depending on the box. Traveling solo, I usually open the sealed bag in the evening, consume one half with my evening meal (2.5 oz or 3 oz), and leave another half for breakfast. In cooler temperatures of night nothing will happen to open jerky in 7-8 hours. I read reports by Florida kayak marathon participants that beef jerky in a warm weather can "grow hair" (mildew) - I used it in 2 long trips and this didn't happen, neither in Baja in February, nor in Bahamas in April (where temperatures were a bit warmer than in Baja). I think it will survive for many more weeks if the sealed bag is intact. More expensive than Pork Sung, (though much better too), and cheaper than freeze-dried meat that I could find locally. Sometimes there is a tiny white bag in a sealed pack - this is oxygen absorbent and not some spices. They usually write a warning on it.

3) Fish Sung - same crap as the Pork Sung, only made of fish. Not sweet, though, but salty and spicy. The only meal that I found to go well with it was instant mashed potato powder. It might go with other meals too, if you add something to block the fish aroma. But with potatoes it goes allright. I make about the same portions as with Pork Sung (2 oz in each ziplock, because the can is 8 oz). I keep all Fish Sung ziplocks together wrapped in a separate grocery bag or a bigger ziplock, otherwise it will stink all over the drybag with other food.

The best source of protein is probably going fishing - this is something that I didn't have time to master in Baja yet. Or hunting. But the only thing I could hunt there are whales (too big for me) and coyotes (this could be interesting). In the last trip I saw both kinds, they are elusive. Saw a sea turtle once or twice, about 2 ft hump, very, very cagey. There are also sea lions, but I wouldn't go after them alone in a small boat :-). Huge, aggressive beasts, and they are always in packs of 10-20. German Sheppard looks like a harmless puppy in comparison.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 10:48 am 
Brotherhood of the Golden Paddle

Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2005 3:40 pm
Posts: 1060
Location: isles of scilly UK
Very interesting unfortunatly not available in my town , but i could fish and hunt, mostly moose and bear, but i don,t do either. I am probably the only person to go on a lake up here without a fishing rod, I generally use tinned food and providing the empty tin,s come home which they do all is fine.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 4:50 pm 
John, all this is sold at T&T superstores - must be few dozens of them in Toronto, and very likely, some other Chinese chain stores unknown even in our Hong-Couver. It's different in small towns (yet). Very few Chinese customers, so there are no stores. Metal tin cans with meat - I tried this, most of it is either too salty, or the can is too big for me, and in a multiday trip garbage disposal is a problem. When I still used cans in Baja, and traveled in Kahuna (smaller boat than K1, very little room to spare) I burned those cans in a bonfire, then flattened and deposited in some deep water offshore. In sea water, after fire removed the protective layer on the metal, they disintegrate in a year or two. Mostly, I stopped using cans because of extra weight, bulk and wrong size for a solo paddler. I tried to find freeze-dried meat, but in Vancouver it's terribly expensive. Down in US the choice and price of freeze-dried meat is better, but still costly - 4 times more than my beef jerky.

PS: Fish Sung that I mentioned, is slightly different from Pork Sung - it is grind, looks like grains of instant coffee (only of different colour). Sometimes the can says "fried fish", but this is the same grind Fish Sung.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 6:39 pm 
Packing for trips is a problem for me since I have an aversion for beef from "budget living" in Alberta, which meant ground beef and stew meat on a near nightly basis when I was growing up.

However, as far as the "sungs" go, if you have a Chinatown nearby, you can find it. Pork is usually is sweet, so I am not surprised. However, I think I found some pork jerky at Safeway once. Easier to find dried pork in Asian cuisine-oriented stores though. However, if there is a good butchershop near you, you should be able to get jerky versions of wild meat or dried strips that are vacuumed packed. That's usually how I get my meat in before planning to go camping or hiking. The problem is that when I used to do these things, I was living in Grande Prairie at the time, which is a more rural town, so I have no idea what it is like living in middle of a metro.

Alm wrote:
The best source of protein is probably going fishing - this is something that I didn't have time to master in Baja yet. Or hunting. But the only thing I could hunt there are whales (too big for me) and coyotes (this could be interesting). In the last trip I saw both kinds, they are elusive.


Tried trolling? Just cast out a handline and secure it on your body and keep going around doing your business; then when you snag a fish, it is just a matter of stopping, putting things away and then bring her in. Have yet to fail me... even caught clams with this method too whenever I snag weeds accidentally on the line. Although, I would like to give a crack at crabbing or prawning someday.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 11:29 pm 
Crabs require big crates to catch them. Some crates are foldable, but too big anyway to consider flying with them. Another problem is that crabs are attracted to stinky and rotten meat, out in the wilderness I don't know what could it be. Here in BC people use rotten chicken pieces.

Yeah, there is a Chinatown in Vancouver, sure. The rest of metro-Vancouver is roughly 50-60% "Chinatown" too. So I don't need to go to Chinatown to buy these things - T&T superstores can be found in many districts. No such thing in Canadian rural areas yet, so for John it's more difficult to find pork sung or fish sung. But this "sung" is not a good product - next time I'll take no more than 20% of sung, the rest of meat will be beef jerky. Beef Jerky (or pork one, if you prefer) can be made home in one of those small dehydrators - they cost under $100, there is a lot of info on the web. I'm just too lazy to do this myself, and hate accumulating gadgets in my kitchen that will be used only once or twice a year.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2009 9:37 am 
knight of the folding kayak realm

Joined: Wed Apr 20, 2005 1:26 am
Posts: 350
Location: Republic of V.I.
Alm wrote:
Another problem is that crabs are attracted to stinky and rotten meat, out in the wilderness I don't know what could it be. Here in BC people use rotten chicken pieces.




The best bait for crabs is a can of sardines (buy them on sale) with two small holes punched in the metal, so the oily stuff can slowly leak out of it. You can easily eat these, if you decide to not fish.

Another option is a canned cat food. The same technique applies, but cannot be used as a snack (unless you really are desperate to have something to eat).

You can purchase boxy crab traps that fold flat and easily store on deck.

The problem with fishing from a folding kayak may be all that blood and slime on a canvass deck you have to deal with.

Also, do not forget valid fishing licence with all its regulations that read with such complexity! But local fisherman will help you to interpret those.

_________________
gregn

Klondike, Nimbus Telkwa


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