Kodiak feedback?

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karenwxyz

Kodiak feedback?

Post by karenwxyz »

Has anyone out there experienced the Kodiak? I'm a largish woman and am wondering if this is the model for me. I have a hard 17'x24" boat but I can't get it to squeeze into a backpack so am looking at one. I would use it mostly for day paddles on easy water. Thanks for any insights.

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krudave
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Post by krudave »

Karen, we need more detail tlo know how the Kodiak will work out for you: are you tall or short? short- or long-waisted? overweight or underweight? strong or not?

Here is a bench mark for you: I an a relatively strong 225 lb male, 5-10 tall, and the Kodiak works well for me, using footpedals adapted from one of the other Folbot models. The stock rudder bar does not give me enough leg room. Also, as is common with folders, to achieve good underdecks contact, I made some thigh pads that velcro onto the under side of the deck.

All of this is detailed on the Folbot Forum. Search the Kodiak Conference and you should be able to see what I did.
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
--
Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.

karenwxyz

Kodiak

Post by karenwxyz »

Thanks Dave - I'm 240 lbs and 5'8', neither notably long or short waisted. Hopefully this means I wouldn't have to modify it since those skills are likely beyond me and there are few resources for that help in my area. I can handle making the thigh braces. Is the folding and unfolding reasonable easy and a one person job? Is it relatively rugged? I won't be good with something that is really delicate. I'm hoping to get stronger with more paddling. 3 years ago when I was paddling a lot I was in much better shape. I am also much older now (58) and lots of things hurt. Does it handle well? etc. I know everything is relative and am not looking for guarantees, just opinions from those who have enough experience to know.

I avoided reading the Folboat site since I wanted to be sure I was getting unbiased info and have liked what I have seen on this site. I will check it out though.

Thanks so much for helping get me back on the water.

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krudave
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Re: Kodiak

Post by krudave »

karenwxyz wrote:Thanks Dave - I'm 240 lbs and 5'8', neither notably long or short waisted. Hopefully this means I wouldn't have to modify it since those skills are likely beyond me and there are few resources for that help in my area.

You may. the cockpit in the Kodiak is remarkably short. You may want to opt for the Yukon, if you are considering Folbots: longer cockpit, hence easier fit, fewer ribs so much easier to assemble, and about 10 lbs lighter [but not as rugged].

I can handle making the thigh braces. Is the folding and unfolding reasonable easy and a one person job? Is it relatively rugged? I won't be good with something that is really delicate.

See above; no, I would have to say the Kodiak is Folbot's most difficult assembly; the Yukon is much easier. The Kodiak is OK for one person, for sure, but it takes much longer than the Yukon or Aleut.

Does it handle well? etc.

Yes. No strange responses. Very stable, and rugged in rough water.

I avoided reading the Folbot site since I wanted to be sure I was getting unbiased info and have liked what I have seen on this site. I will check it out though.

Well, there is a "cult" aspect to some of the folks on the Folbot Forum site, but it is pretty easy to weed out their responses. I am a frequent poster there. As manufacturer-originated sites go, it is very good, The owner of Folbot, Phil Cotton, is one of the most straightforward, honest guy you will ever meet, and has a strictly "hands off" policy about the Folbot Forum. You will get bias anyplace, and that certainly includes this site!

Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
--
Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.

karenwxyz

Post by karenwxyz »

Thanks again. Since you have one and have practiced, how long does it take you to assemble and tear down and does any of it require lots of strength? Your info has been just what I was looking for. You have been a great help.

kayakamper

Post by kayakamper »

I have to agree with Dave here, Karen. Having been around this forum for a while, he is one of the authorities when it comes to Folbot.

I have been skirting around the edges of buying a Folbot for several years now, but just can't break away from my Feathercraft Kahuna.

I might suggest that, if you are ever in the Charleston S.C. area, a trip to Folbot would give you the ability to 'test them out' and find the boat for you. Cincinnati is not too far.... :roll:

Also, I keep mentioning this in other threads, but the East Coast Canoe and Kayak Festival is in Charleston every April ( wrong time of year, I know :oops: ). It is a great festival for classes and to try out boats. This year, Folbot was suprisingly absent, but promised to return in '08.

Chris

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krudave
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Post by krudave »

karenwxyz wrote:Thanks again. Since you have one and have practiced, how long does it take you to assemble and tear down and does any of it require lots of strength?
About 20-30 minues, although I have never made any serious effort to speed the process up; I store mine folded except when it rises to the top of the heap for paddling, so most paddles with it do not involve set up. No extraordinary strength required, although some of the frames are a tight fit. The Yukon is much easier to set up. I'd recommned a Yukon for you over a Kodiak.

And, if you have the money, a Feathercraft Kahuna would be a good choice, also. A faster boat than the Kodiak.
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
--
Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.

karenwxyz

The Kodiak is mine! Hurray I think

Post by karenwxyz »

I bought one tonight on ebay as I noticed the same folks posting here were also on ebay. I just have to get it from Tennessee or NC. I am really ready for it as I have made too many camping trips to places with water but no boat this year. I'll keep all posted as to its success.

Alm

Post by Alm »

Boats that are quick and simple to assemble, are usually short and/or slow and/or less rugged than those that are more difficult. I don't think that time and ease of assembling can justify buying a Kodiak over FC Kahuna. I own Kahuna, older model, which takes 4-5 minutes longer than last models, and it is 25-35 minutes without rudder. (I don't know whether 20-30 minutes of Kodiak include rudder, - probably not 20 minutes).

The efforts required to assemble/dissemble/maintain the folder can reach the point when you feel that would rather skip this day paddle, - and this is bad. I wouldn't assemble Kahuna for less than a full day - not worth the pain. For a full day - yes, I would. With Kodiak you'll win may be a few minutes of time (and few calories - Kahuna's assembling takes more energy), and will get a bit slower boat, so why bother... If Yukon is really easier to assemble than Kodiak, this could justify the purchase (it will be slower than Kodiak, but Kodiak is already not a racing boat, so what the heck)... Kahuna isn't a racer either; easy to paddle, but not very fast - with 15 ft hull it can't be too fast.

Folbot on Ebay?... I wouldn't buy it there before exhausting the options like Folbot forum. Ebay prices of Folbots tend to be higher than in "For sale" section of Folbot forum, and if anything, much less information about the boat than on Folbot forum.

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krudave
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Post by krudave »

The Kodiak is not a quick-assembling boat; the Yukon is, mainly because it has only three frames to five for the Kodiak. I'd guess the Kahuna is quicker to assemble than a Kodiak, although I have never put a Kahuna together. Takes me about half an hour to assemble my Kodiak, rudder assembly and all, and there are some difficulties with frames. Rudder is easy.
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
--
Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.

karenwxyz

my new Kodiak

Post by karenwxyz »

Too late about ebay. I was cautious and did find that many had also had the boat on this forum first and I was aware of the current going prices on several venues - here and p-net as well as on ebay. I guess I'm about to find out how quickly I can get it assembled. It sounds like they are all relatively comparable until those folks with the expandable/collapsible hoops get in the game. You know - the ones like the windshield covers that just pop open. They make tents and toys, too. Now if they would work on the boat issue ;-)

Thanks to all for their words of wisdom. I'm sure I;ll be back looking for more answers.

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krudave
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Post by krudave »

Karen, glad you finally popped for a boat. Keep us posted on how it works out for you, and let us know how we can help.

I gather you bought a Kodiak?
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
--
Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.

karenwxyz

The new blue Kodiak

Post by karenwxyz »

All I really know is that I bought it from the owner/user who claims no damage. It has been used mostly in fresh water but well cared for, esp after it's outing into salt water. It is a 1998 per boat ID # and with the entire expedition package. For $1200 I think I will love having the boat in my RV and won't have spent all my traveling cash - just most of it. We'll see how well it works. Since it came from ebay, it can always go back there. Stay tuned for the further adventures.

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krudave
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Post by krudave »

A 1998 boat, unless the owner upgraded, will have plastic washboards (narrow slats that marry the frames to the deck fabric; they also define the cockpit perimeter and form a sill that keeps splashes out of the cockpit). These are OK, but it is worth it to get an upgrade to the aluminum washboards that became available in 2000. The aluminum ones are stronger and assist in stiffening the boat. I think they are about $75 from Folbot.

That 1998 boat should also have the older rudder pedal system, which is better than the one sold with Kodiaks since about 2001. It is a little cumbersome to adjust and install, but it allows fine tuning of the foot pedal placement, and allows for a more natural foot location than the rudder bar system now sold as stock.

If the boat is as advertised, I think it should give you good service.
Dave Kruger
Astoria, OR
--
Folbot Kodiak, Cooper, and Edisto; three hardshells; Mothership: Surf Scoter the Bartender; dinghy Little Blue Duck.

karenwxyz

The new Kodiak

Post by karenwxyz »

Thanks for the info. I just talked to the seller and he was also the fond user. That old story - he has a young child and has to give up something extra-familial. That's how us retirees get boats! It's coming with new sponsons and I'll get used to it is as it comes and then look at upgrades. It's good to know this group is out there as it has been wonderfully helpful and supportive. I may know more by the weekend when I get it in my hot little hands! I'll probably need help when I have my first assembly meltdown. Thanks all.

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