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 Post subject: Applying Varnish
PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2009 12:35 pm 
I just purchased a used Klepper AE2 and would like to apply a coat of clear coat varnish, but I have a couple of questions.

1. Does any cleaning need to be done prior to application, more than being wiped down with a damp cloth?
2. Does any sanding need to be done first also.
3. I have a set of Klepper paddles, also and much of the varnish is warn off, as well as the dark brown 'stain' on the blades. Would one apply stain or just varnish?
4. Is outdoor polyurethane varnish be sufficient or do I need a special marine varnish?

Thanks for the help

Bob


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 Post subject: Re: Applying Varnish
PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2009 2:41 pm 
This is what I'd do if I had wooden frame that was in need of TLC:

1. wipe out all wooden parts with a solution of TSP to eliminate any oily deposits

2. with a scraper, gently remove any flaky old varnish

3. sand everything lightly with 120 grit, without worrying too much about blackened spots

4. clean parts with tack cloth to remove dust particles

5. wipe out everything with cloth moistened in turpentine, or paint thinner

6. tape metal parts with masking tape

7. apply two or more coats of varnish. Any varnish will do it, as the frame is not exposed to sun light. Lightly sand with 220 grit sandpaper between coats, and clean with tack cloth.

In wood refinishing, all above steps are important. Leave one out and feelings of regret and distaste will occur. Better to do it right in the first place.

In 50 years, or so wooden paddles by Klepper will become collectors items. I'd treat them therefore as any other wooden parts of the kayak. No need to use stain. After treatment, I'd store them in the attic for the future generations (within my family). One day they may decide to use them to decorate country cottage on the lake. It would also become the only thing that they will know about their great grandpa.


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 Post subject: Re: Applying Varnish
PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2009 2:57 pm 
Thank you for such a thorough and thought out response. I will definitely redo the paddles correctly and keep them for the future.
--Bob


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 Post subject: Re: Applying Varnish
PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2009 1:40 am 
gregn wrote:
6. tape metal parts with masking tape

7. apply two or more coats of varnish.

Like something terrible would happen to metal parts not covered with masking tape... As to the paddles - they are just paddles... Varnish will be gone on half the surface in a couple of seasons. And then a practical way to minimize water absorption in paddles (you can never eliminate it completely) is treating it with Deftoil once a season. On the shaft Deft will be gone pretty soon too, but shaft is normally dry, unless it's a submarine paddling.

Quote:
In 50 years, or so wooden paddles by Klepper will become collectors items.

Nah... Too many of them, too simple product. Not more collectors item than those 50-yrs old reed snowshoes displayed over fireplaces in some homes and skiing lodges. And the owner, if a showshoer himself, uses metal and composite snowshoes. (Most Klepper boaters use composite paddles too, these days, - more efficient gear). I've heard some showshoes found in Siberia were carbon-dated to 2500 B.C., but those were in a condition not suitable for displaying over a fireplace.

Quote:
After treatment, I'd store them in the attic for the future generations (within my family). One day they may decide to use them to decorate country cottage on the lake. It would also become the only thing that they will know about their great grandpa

You've got it right. They won't know a sh.t.
"There is no remembrance of the former generations ; neither shall there be any remembrance of the latter generations that are to come, among those that shall come after." (Ecclesiastes 1:11)

You're also right that storing them in attic for future generations is the best one can do with this item.... Buying a decent pair of composite paddles meanwhile, and using them for the purpose that they were made for.


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 Post subject: Re: Applying Varnish
PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 12:52 pm 
I might add that using a heat gun and plastic scraper will significantly reduce the amount of labour. Just be carefull not to overheat near any of the rod holders etc. This will help reduce the amount of wood sanding etc.

For the spar finish not removed, a good buffing with 120 will set it up for the next coat. I would recommend about 8 total coats.

Alex is right that the hardware shouldn't need to be masked unless you intend to get sloppy. Just don't apply the varnish to the snap locks, tongues and hinges. Too thin or too much varnish will run and bead, -another reason not to be sloppy.


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 Post subject: Re: Applying Varnish
PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2019 1:23 am 
paddler
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Joined: Fri Mar 01, 2019 12:11 am
Posts: 8
Reviving this nearly thread 10-year-old thread (!) as I'm now re-varnishing my own Klepper's wood. Help on any of the additional questions below would be appreciated.

1. Is it worth sanding with 220 grit in between sanding with 120 and applying the first coat of varnish? A guy at my local hardware store suggested I get the wood as smooth as possible before applying the first coat. His recommendation was: sand with 120 > sand with 220 until very smooth > clean/wipe off dust > apply first coat of varnish > sand with 120 lightly > clean/wipe off dust > apply second coat of varnish > sand with 120 lightly > apply third coat of varnish [repeat the until satisfied]

2. Is it worth adding turpentine or paint thinner to the first couple coats of varnish? I've read mixed opinions on whether this is necessary. Some say adding a little allows the varnish to penetrate more deeply into the wood, giving it more "bite" and a longer lasting finish. Others say it's unnecessary.

3. How long to wait between each coat of varnish, or does it vary? Is there a way to tell when the wood is ready for another coat of varnish by sight, smell, or touch?

4. Any tips/advice for how to work around the metal clasps and fittings? Some of the wood will be pretty hard to reach without removing the metal fittings. I worry that removing the metal pieces will compromise their ability to stay fastened when I put them back in.

_________________
--
Klepper Aerius I 450


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